Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Consider the following example:

$target = 'Xa,a,aX';
$pattern = '/X((a),?)*X/';
$matches = array();
preg_match_all($pattern,$target,$matches,PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE|PREG_PATTERN_ORDER);
var_dump($matches);

What it does is returning only the last 'a' in the series, but what I need is all the 'a's.

Particularly, I need the position of ALL EACH OF the 'a's inside the string separately, thus PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE.

The example is much more complex, see the related question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1799419/pattern-matching-an-array-not-their-elements-per-se

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
If this description is not a good representation of your actual problem, why start this new post at all? – Bart Kiers Nov 25 '09 at 22:10
    
It is simplified, it's another "sub-problem" of my complex problem, and it can be seen as a standalone problem, with its own solution. – Flavius Nov 25 '09 at 22:16
    
Can the target contain multiple lists of a's, eg: 'abcdXa,a,a,aXefghiXa,a,a,a,a,a,a,aX'? If so, do you want two separate arrays in this case, one for each list of a's, or one combined array containing the indexes of all the a's regardless of where they came from? – Mark Byers Nov 25 '09 at 22:21
    
No, there is only one pair of X, no nesting or whatever. I need each position at which an a can be found within the target. – Flavius Nov 25 '09 at 22:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It groups a single match since the regex X((a),?)*X matches the entire string. The last ((a),?) will be grouped.

What you want to match is an a that has an X before it (and the start of the string), has a comma ahead of it, or has an X ahead of it (and the end of the string).

$target = 'Xa,a,aX';
$pattern = '/(?<=^X)a|a(?=X$|,)/';
preg_match_all($pattern, $target, $matches, PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE);
print_r($matches);

Output:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [0] => a
                    [1] => 1
                )

            [1] => Array
                (
                    [0] => a
                    [1] => 3
                )

            [2] => Array
                (
                    [0] => a
                    [1] => 5
                )

        )

)
share|improve this answer

When your regex includes X, it matches once. It finds one large match with groups in it. What you want is many matches, each with its own position.

So, in my opinion the best you can do is simply search for /a/ or /a,?/ without any X. Then matches[0] will contain all appearances of 'a'

If you need them between X, pre-select this part of the string.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.