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I have a class such that:

 public class Foo : IEquatable<Bar>, IComparable{

 [DataMember]
 public Bar bar;

 public override bool Equals(object obj){
     //Check if not hte right object, return false;
     return this.bar == obj as Bar;
 }
 public bool Equals(Bar other){
    if(this.bar == other){
        return this.bar == other;
    }
 }
}

I want to be able to have a list of Foo's, which contain bars, and use the Contains() method to check to see if Bar bar is inside the list of Foos. So far, I've had no luck, and from what i've read you can only compare types with IEquatable if they have the same parent that defines IEquatable or if they are the same type.

Any one know if you can implement

List<Foo> foos.Contains(Bar bar) ?

Also, I'd like to have a list of Bars, and be able to remove any that are contained in a list of Foos, such that;

 List<Bar> bars = bars.Where( r => (List<Foo>) !foos.Contains(r)).ToList();  \

This is the most important thing I need, and looks really clean. Of course, I could just do these comparison in a for each loop, but I want to avoid that if possible and maybe not pay an n*m penalty.

Thanks

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In my opinion this code looks really weird:

foos.Contains(bar)

What do you think about:

foos.Any(f => f.Bar == bar)

Code after you update - I assume you have collection of bars and you want to exclude all Bars that are referenced by Foos in foos collection:

bars.Except(foos.Select(f => f.Bar))
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I like it, but lets say I've got a list of Bars, and I want to keep in finalBars only the unique entries. Would this work? finalBars => foos.any(f => f.Bar.barid != finalBars.any(r => r.barid))? –  Magn3s1um Aug 1 '13 at 19:59
    
@Magn3s1um I don't understand what you're trying to accomplish. Do you want unique bars or unique foos? Maybe you should update your question and give more detailed description. –  empi Aug 1 '13 at 20:10
    
@Magn3s1um - it feels like you trying to implement very slow version of Enumerable.Distinct that takes comparer... Check out my answer for possible comparer that may help you there. –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 1 '13 at 20:12
    
@Magn3s1um check my updated answer - do you want something like this? –  empi Aug 1 '13 at 20:19
    
That's perfect actually, but can you go one further, as in: bars.Except(where bars.Property is not in foos.Bars.Property)? –  Magn3s1um Aug 1 '13 at 20:23
show 3 more comments

Empi's answer with foo.Any(f => f.Bar == bar) looks very clean to me, but if you want to stick with comparison - use the other override of Enumerable.Contains and create custom "CompareFooByBar" comparer (also you still need to pass Foo as search term, but you can use totally fake one).

class CompareFooByBar : IEqualityComparer<Foo>
{
    public bool Equals(Foo x, Foo y)
    {
        return x.Bar == y.Bar;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Foo x)
    {
        return  x.Bar.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Usage:

foos.Contains(new Foo{Bar = bar}, new CompareFooByBar())

One more option is to completely cheat and have comparer that simply compares to fixed value (but it would rely on internal implementation of Contains to call Equals with particular order of arguments and make Equals non-symmetric):

class CompareFooToBar : IEqualityComparer<Foo>
{
    Bar bar;
    public CompareFooToBar(Bar bar) { this.bar = bar;}

    public bool Equals(Foo x, Foo y)
    {
        // hack - ignore y completely, assuming Contains pass element as x
        return x.Bar == bar; 
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Foo x) 
    {
        return  0;
    }
}

foos.Contains(null, new CompareFooToBar(bar))
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