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I've got a class which uses the context management protocol to have a silent stderr stream for a while (mainly used for py2exe deployments, where the app writing anything to stderr causes ugly dialogs when the app is closed, and I'm doing something that I know will have some stderr output)

import sys
import os
from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def noStderr():
    stderr = sys.stderr
    sys.stderr = open(os.devnull, "w")
    yield
    sys.stderr = stderr

My question is what would be more pythonic, the reasonably clean solution of opening the system's bit bucket and writing to that, or skipping allocation of the fd and write operations, and creating a new class ala:

class nullWriter(object):
    def write(self, string):
        pass

and then replacing the above code with

from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def noStderr():
    stderr = sys.stderr
    sys.stderr = nullWriter()
    yield
    sys.stderr = stderr
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think the latter solution is the more elegant. You avoid going to the system environment, potentially wasting an fd. Why go out the operating system when it's not needed?

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Thanks all for the replies.

I think I will go with the nullWriter approach. I'm aware that both options work, but more interested to see what seems cleaner (esp as the overhead of opening the file is negligable).

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What's wrong with that?

import sys

sys.stderr = open('/dev/null', 'w')
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2  
As abyx suggested, you should use os.devnull to be platform independent. Since the OP mentioned py2exe this is likely a Windows box. –  Andrew Dalke Nov 26 '09 at 7:38
    
true. However it isn't the point. I am not that concerned about portable code for those couple of lines that demonstrate the solution. –  prime_number Nov 26 '09 at 8:33
    
But as he's likely on a Windows box, he might not even know what /dev/null means, making your advice less helpful than it should be. –  Andrew Dalke Nov 27 '09 at 8:33
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It's a decision between using things that already exist (os.devnull) but are a bit "messier" (you need to open() it etc'), and creating your own solution, which might be simpler, but it's a new class that you're creating.

Though both are totally fine, I would have gone with the nullWriter, as it's cleaner and depends on pure python knowledge and doesn't mess with os things.

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I feel that the nullWriter class would be more "Pythonic" because it uses the Python interfaces already in place (that you can assign sys.stderr to anything that has a write method), rather than having to go out to the system environment and write to the "bit bucket" as you put it :)

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And FWIW, I would say that writing to the "bit bucket" would be a more Perlish solution :) –  Chirael Nov 25 '09 at 22:41
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