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I see named functions exampled this way:

var clearClick = function() {
    // do something
}

...and then used for binding like so:

$("#clear").bind(click, clearClick);

...or with the "shorthand" methodology thus:

$("#clear").click(clearClick);

But why not use a more "normal" (similar to other programming languages) construct like this:

function clearClick() {
    // do something
}

It works the same, doesn't it? Is there any disadvantage to defining functions in this traditional way? Is the previous way just jQuerians flaunting their newfangledness?

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marked as duplicate by tymeJV, Mathletics, Joe, Paulpro, Andre Aug 1 '13 at 20:45

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2  
Whoever edited it: "nonymous" means "named", as "anonymous" means "not named" (the "a" portion meaning "without," anonymous means without a name). IOW, they were not typos on my part. –  B. Clay Shannon Aug 1 '13 at 20:40
12  
Nobody ever says nonymous, ever. –  Mathletics Aug 1 '13 at 20:41
3  
@Zenith why, Urban Dictionary of course! –  Mathletics Aug 1 '13 at 20:43
5  
The opposite of "anonymous" is "onymous", not "nonymous". And even then, it's not the right word here. –  BoltClock Aug 1 '13 at 20:44
3  
@Mathletics Ahh! So it must be a word ;D –  null Aug 1 '13 at 20:44
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This works Function expression

var clearClick = function() {
    // do something
}

$("#clear").bind(click, clearClick);

This does not work Function expression. The order matters here.

$("#clear").bind(click, clearClick);

var clearClick = function() {
    // do something
}

But when you declare your function using a function declaration the order does not matter. One more advantage of the below syntax is that the function name appears in debugger.

function clearClick() {
    // do something
}
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some older browsers have bugs related to function declarations. –  Brandon Aug 1 '13 at 20:46
1  
This doesn't properly explain why. Please see JavaScript Hoisting –  naomik Aug 1 '13 at 20:51
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One reason you might want to do it is how this works:

var clearClick;
$("#clear").click(clearClick);

clearClick = function() {
    // do something
}

... lots of stuff in here ...

clearClick = function() {
    // do something different
}
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That click handler still won't work no matter how many times you change it. –  Mathletics Aug 1 '13 at 20:45
    
@Mathletics Feel free to suggest changes. Remember its just a scaffolding to highlight the way to define and redefine. –  Lee Meador Aug 1 '13 at 20:49
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