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Please read the code below, the questions are at the end.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace Graphics
{
    public interface IGraphicsFactory
    {
        ICanvas CreateCanvas();
        Square CreateSquare();
        ComposedShape CreateComposedShape();
    }

    public class SimpleGraphicsFactory : IGraphicsFactory
    {
        public Square CreateSquare()
        {
            return new SimpleImpl.SimpleSquare();
        }

        public ComposedShape CreateComposedShape()
        {
            return new SimpleImpl.SimpleComposedShape();
        }

        public ICanvas CreateCanvas()
        {
            return new SimpleImpl.SimpleCanvas();
        }
    }

    public interface ICanvas
    {
        void AddShape(ShapeBase shape);
        void Render();
    }

    public abstract class ShapeBase
    {
        public abstract void Paint(ICanvas canvas);
    }

    public abstract class Square : ShapeBase
    {
        public int size;
    }

    public abstract class ComposedShape : ShapeBase
    {
        public int size;
        public ShapeBase InternalShape1 { get; set; }
        public ShapeBase InternalShape2 { get; set; }
    }
}


namespace Graphics.SimpleImpl
{
    internal class SimpleSquare : Graphics.Square
    {
        public void Init()
        {
            // do something really important
        }

        public override void Paint(ICanvas canvas)
        {
            Init();

            //?? how to avoid the type cast? (and I want to keep the DrawLine out of the ICanvas interface)
            SimpleCanvas scanvas = (canvas as SimpleCanvas);
            scanvas.DrawLine();
            scanvas.DrawLine();
            scanvas.DrawLine();
            scanvas.DrawLine();
        }
    }

    internal class SimpleComposedShape : Graphics.ComposedShape
    {
        public void Init()
        {
            //?? how can I call `InternalShape1.Init', preferably without type casts? (and I want to keep `Init` out of the `ShapeBase` class)
            // this.InternalShape1.Init();
            // this.InternalShape2.Init();
        }

        public override void Paint(ICanvas canvas)
        {
            Init();
            // TODO: draw the thing
        }
    }

    internal class SimpleCanvas : Graphics.ICanvas
    {
        List<ShapeBase> shapes = new List<ShapeBase>();

        public void AddShape(ShapeBase shape)
        {
            shapes.Add(shape);
        }

        public void Render()
        {
            foreach (ShapeBase s in shapes)
            {
                s.Paint(this);
            }
        }


        public void DrawLine()
        {
        }
    }
}


namespace Test
{
    using Graphics;
    class TestSimpleGraphics
    {
        static void Test1()
        {
            IGraphicsFactory fact = new SimpleGraphicsFactory();
            ICanvas canvas = fact.CreateCanvas();

            Square sq1 = fact.CreateSquare();
            Square sq2 = fact.CreateSquare();
            ComposedShape cs = fact.CreateComposedShape();
            cs.InternalShape1 = sq1;
            cs.InternalShape2 = sq2;

            canvas.AddShape(cs);
            canvas.Paint();
        }
    }
}
  1. Is my abstract factory pattern implementation correct?
  2. Inside SimpleSquare.Paint: it is possible to avoid the type cast? (and I want to keep the DrawLine out of the ICanvas interface)
  3. Inside SimpleComposedShape.Init: how can I call InternalShape.Init, preferably without type casts? (and I want to keep Init out of the ShapeBase class)
share|improve this question
    
This is too much code to address #1, but for #2: you cannot avoid the cast without putting it in that interface (or a different one) or perhaps using a generic somewhere. Also, you need to check for null after the cast. For #3, I'd just add it to the base class or use a generic ComposedShape<T> where T : ShapeBase. –  lukegravitt Aug 1 '13 at 21:36
    
If you have a factory for ICanvas implementations, I would name it CanvasFactory. Also, what is your ICanvas supposed to represent or abstract? I don't understand its purpose. When should AddShape be called? Why does a canvas contain a list of shapes? What should happen inside ShapeBase.Paint? Is a ICanvas implementation responsible for drawing graphics primitives? In that case, why shouldn't it provide public methods for that? –  Groo Aug 2 '13 at 13:20
    
@Groo: my graphics model is meant to be something like a "retained mode" graphics library, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retained_mode. So, think of the canvas like something similar to the DOM of the browser. It doesn't provide primitives to draw lines or rectangles, just to add objects into it, and the objects are rendered internally. The ShapeBase.Paint is abstract so it can't have a body. And this whole thing is just an equivalent model of something else I'm working on, which has completely different semantics, probably that's why the sample code it's not the best. –  bosonix Aug 2 '13 at 13:40
    
Yes, I understand that you want to store the DOM, but the point is that a concrete ICanvas should store primitive shapes which are aware of its actual implementation (for example, a SimpleSquare should have a Paint(SimpleCanvas) method, not a Paint(ICanvas) method). –  Groo Aug 2 '13 at 14:05
    
In the interest of KISS, do you really have multiple families of implementations? ARe you really going to have a set of SimpleXXX classes and also a sent of ComplexXxx classes and a MediocreXxx classes? Don't over-complicate if you don't need it. –  tcarvin Aug 2 '13 at 14:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1 - I think your SimpleGraphicsFactory is indeed a good example of an Abstract Factory.

2 - It is completely appropriate that SimpleSquare casts to SimpleCanvas because they are both part of the same "family", created by the same concrete factory. Recall the definition of Abstract Factory (emphasis is mine):

Provide an interface for creating families of related or dependent objects without specifying their concrete classes.

The implication of this design pattern is that the classes created by it can assume / require they are being used with classes from the same family.

To use another example from the .NET world, the System.Data namespaces acts in a similar way. Objects from the System.Data.Sql namespaces will not work with objects from System.Data.Oracle. You cannot pass a SqlParameter where an OracleParameter is expected. You select the family and stay within the family.

3 - I cannot tell what you are trying to do, you;ll need to comment with details and I'll revies my answer to address. I would expect a ComposedShape to have a method Add(Shape s) that lets the caller add multiple shapes to the composite (container). But perhaps I misunderstand.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answers. I wasn't sure that my implementation is correct, because of the casts required in the concrete classes. These casts feel somehow natural, but it will be nice to avoid them, and I wanted to know if this is also possible. I modified the code example to be a little bit more clear; in my example, the ComposedShape is simpler than you expected, it contains just two different shapes, which are specified at runtime. The requirement, in my case, is that both of the internal shapes have to be completely initialized before calling Paint. –  bosonix Aug 2 '13 at 13:29
    
I don't agree that these casts are "completely appropriate". I've rarely seen a cast which doesn't indicate a problem in OOP implementation, and in this case the solutions are obvious: you either want to have a concrete SimpleCanvas parameter in SimpleSquare.Paint, or you need to make this method public. –  Groo Aug 2 '13 at 14:02
    
It is tough when OP asks multiple questions in a single post. I did not want to dissect the methods too much. The theme (and title) of the question was on having dependencies between objects created in the Abstract Factory pattern. And to that I say that yes you can. It is what it is designed for. To get down to the nitty-gritty, I don't understand why Paint would be a family-specific method so I suspect there are other problems in the design. –  tcarvin Aug 2 '13 at 14:32
    
And from looking at the edits and comments on the original question, the code sample is just a sample for discussion sake and may not be worth dissecting too much. –  tcarvin Aug 2 '13 at 14:37

If I got your intentions right, you are trying to mimic the functionality of the System.Drawing.Graphics class (or HTML <canvas>, for example).

If that's correct, I would give following suggestions:

  1. Rename IGraphicsFactory to ICanvasFactory and let it create only concrete ICanvas implementations. Remove the CreateSquare and other methods, because you don't have to create shapes through a factory (it's only important that your Shapes are passed a concrete ICanvas implementation).

  2. The ICanvas interface represents a canvas which can draw primitive shapes (lines, circles, filled areas, etc.). This means that you should expose public methods which will allow callers to create these primitives. Graphics also provides various transformation capabilities, but this may be an overkill right now:

    interface ICanvas
    {
         void Clear();
         void DrawLine(Point from, Point to, Pen pen);
         void DrawCircle(Point center, Double radius, Pen pen);
         void Paint();
         /* and stuff like that */
    }
    
  3. A Canvas should not contain a list of Shapes, but rather a list of primitives. E.g., when you call the ICanvas.DrawLine(...) method, it should create an instance of a Line primitive and store it in the internal list.

    The functionality of these primitive classes will depend on the actual implementation of your ICanvas (does it paint to a Bitmap, or to a printer, etc.). You will also have some hidden, implementation-dependent data (I will use a byte[], pretending it stores an 8-bit bitmap of some sort):

    class BitmapCanvas : ICanvas
    {
        private readonly byte[] _bitmapData;
        private readonly List<IBitmapShape> _primitives;
    
        public BitmapCanvas(int width, int height)
        {
            _bitmapData = new byte[width * height];
            _primitives = new List<IPrimitiveShape>();
        }
    
        public void DrawLine(...) 
        {
            // different implementations will handle this part differently.
            _primitives.Add(new BitmapLine(_bitmapData, from, to, pen));
        }
    
        public void Paint()
        {
            Clear(_bitmapData);
            foreach (var shape in _primitives)
                shape.Draw();
        }
    }
    
  4. Concrete primitive classes would then handle this internal logic:

    class BitmapLine : IBitmapShape
    {
        public void Draw()
        {
            // write to the underlying byte array
        }
    }
    
  5. Since ICanvas implementation will not draw actual shapes, you don't need the ShapeBase class. You will, however, need an analogue class for drawing graphic primitives (called IBitmapShape above).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but this doesn't address my questions at all. The example is just an equivalent model of something else I'm working on, which has completely different semantics, so probably that's you feel that I want something else. –  bosonix Aug 2 '13 at 13:47
    
I thought I answered them implicitly, but if you want explicit answers, here they go: 1. Correct factory implementation? Yes and no. Needs to be renamed according to .NET naming conventions, and needs to lose methods which don't belong there. 2. Cast inside SimpleSquare.Paint: yes, you need to make the method public, because canvas abstractions are supposed to abstract these methods for other classes (and allow other classes to call them - check how System.Drawing.Graphics and HTML canvas work. 3. The Init method should be removed and done inside the Shape constructor. –  Groo Aug 2 '13 at 13:54
    
The thing is that I don't want to implement a graphics system at all, but something else. So to give you another example, suppose that I want to implement a database access library. Then ICanvas is something like ISqlConnection, ICanvas.Render is like ISqlConnection.Execute, ShapeBase is SqlCommand, SquareShape is SelectCommand, SimpleCanvas can be MySqlConnection. So, even if my example models do not make sens in real world, I can't do such big changes as you proposed. –  bosonix Aug 2 '13 at 14:06
    
First of all, there is no such thing as ISqlConnection. There is an IDbConnection and a concrete SqlConnection. And this brings us exactly to what I am talking about: an SqlCommand takes a concrete SqlConnection in its constructor, not just an arbitrary IDbConnection. That's why your SimpleSquare needs to take a concrete SimpleCanvas (note the Simple - Sql prefix analogy) and throw away the ICanvas interface, removing the need for casting. –  Groo Aug 2 '13 at 14:12
    
ShapeBase.Paint(ICanvas) method is redundant, as well as that whole abstract class. I would replace ShapeBase with interface ISimpleShape { void Paint(ISimpleCanvas); } for all simple shapes and get rid of the ShapeBase class completely (it's simply not something you need to impose on all ICanvas implentations). –  Groo Aug 2 '13 at 14:17

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