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Is there any easy way to get maximum number of consecutive 1's in a string like: "000010011100011111001111111100" ?

I, definitely, can do it with loops but I'd like to avoid that since my actual dataset has about 500,000 records.

Thanks for your help in advance.

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marked as duplicate by Brad M, Thomas, eddi, GSee, mnel Aug 1 '13 at 23:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What have you tried (and other questions from the Stack Overflow question checklist)? –  Joshua Ulrich Aug 1 '13 at 21:01
    
I only tried using loops. I have two loops one as a counter on row number that starts from the first row of the dataset and goes all the way to the end. Another loop as a counter of number of consecutive 1's. But it's very inefficient and takes a long time to run. –  Sepehr Aug 1 '13 at 21:04
    
@Thomas, you are right. I searched but I didn't find anything. I should've used better keywords to search. –  Sepehr Aug 1 '13 at 21:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use rle:

x <- "000010011100011111001111111100"
rr <- rle(strsplit(x,"")[[1]])

Run Length Encoding
  lengths: int [1:9] 4 1 2 3 3 5 2 8 2
  values : chr [1:9] "0" "1" "0" "1" "0" "1" "0" "1" "0"

Note: I removed the as.numeric part as it's not necessary. From here, you can get the maximum count of consecutive 1's with:

max(rr$lengths[which(rr$values == "1")])
# [1] 8
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Thanks @Thomas. This solved my issue. –  Sepehr Aug 1 '13 at 21:12
    
@Arun - I think that should be a separate answer rather than an edit. If you do so, I can probably delete mine then. –  thelatemail Aug 1 '13 at 23:00
    
@thelatemail, Yes, I realise that now. posted separately. Thanks. (Thomas, sorry for the mess). –  Arun Aug 1 '13 at 23:02

Using rle is slower and a bit more clumsy than using regular expressions. In Thomas' answer, you're still left to extract the max length when the values equal 1.

# make some data
set.seed(21)
N <- 1e5
s <- sample(c("0","1"), N*30, TRUE)
s <- split(s, rep(1:N, each=30))
s <- sapply(s, paste, collapse="")
# Thomas' (complete) answer
r <- function(S) {
  sapply(S, function(x) {
    rl <- rle(as.numeric(strsplit(x,"")[[1]]))
    max(rl$lengths[rl$values==1])
  })
}
# using regular expressions
g <- function(S) sapply(gregexpr("1*",S),
   function(x) max(attr(x,'match.length')))
# timing
system.time(R <- r(s))
#    user  system elapsed 
#    6.41    0.00    6.41
system.time(G <- g(s))
#    user  system elapsed 
#    1.47    0.00    1.46
all.equal(R,G)
# [1] "names for target but not for current"
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Thanks @Joshua for your useful answer. –  Sepehr Aug 2 '13 at 5:52

An alternative much faster way without using rle would be to split with consecutive 0's as follows:

# following thelatemail's comment, changed '0+' to '[^1]+'
strsplit(x, "[^1]+", perl=TRUE)

Then you can loop over and get maximum characters for each element of your list. This'll be faster than rle solution as well. and is also faster than the gregexpr solution from @Joshua. Some benchmarking...

zz <- function(x) {
    vapply(strsplit(x, "[^1]+", perl=TRUE), function(x) max(nchar(x)), 0L)
}

I just realised that @Joshua's function could also be tweaked by adding perl=TRUE and using vapply. So, I'll compare that as well.

g2 <- function(S) vapply(gregexpr("1*",S, perl=TRUE),
   function(x) max(attr(x,'match.length')), 0L)

require(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(t1 <- zz(unname(s)), t2 <- g(unname(s)), t3 <- g2(unname(s)), times=50)
Unit: seconds
                expr      min       lq   median       uq      max neval
 t1 <- zz(unname(s)) 1.187197 1.285065 1.344371 1.497564 1.565481    50
  t2 <- g(unname(s)) 2.154038 2.307953 2.357789 2.417259 2.596787    50
 t3 <- g2(unname(s)) 1.562661 1.854143 1.914597 1.954795 2.203543    50

identical(t1, t2) # [1] TRUE
identical(t1, t3) # [1] TRUE
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Nice. To generalise in the case where there are characters other than 0 or 1 would be to replace "0+" with "[^1]" in the strsplit call. Marginally slower, but probably safer. –  thelatemail Aug 1 '13 at 23:06
    
Yes indeed, you're right. But I don't think it'll affect the performance. –  Arun Aug 1 '13 at 23:08
    
about 50% slower in my testing. From 0.5s to 0.75s. –  thelatemail Aug 1 '13 at 23:10
    
Just did the benchmark again. It takes 1.1 seconds with "0+" and 1.22 with "[^1]+". –  Arun Aug 1 '13 at 23:34
    
Thank so much @Arun for answering the question. –  Sepehr Aug 2 '13 at 5:53

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