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If I have a property that might be a string or a boolean how do I define it:

interface Foo{
    bar:string;
    bar:boolean;
}

I don't want to resort to:

interface Foo{
    bar:any;
}

I don't think its possible without any. You can answer any of these:

Have I overlooked a spec and its possible right now? Is something like this planned? Has a feature request been logged: http://typescript.codeplex.com/workitem/list/basic ? (UPDATE this is the issue report you can vote on https://typescript.codeplex.com/workitem/1364)

I would imagine something like this:

interface Foo{
    bar:string;
    bar:boolean;
    bar:any; 
}

var x:Foo = <any>{};
x.bar="asdf";
x.bar.toUpperCase(); // intellisence only for string 
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Not sure of your usage scenario but would generics help you here? –  Damian Aug 2 '13 at 18:25
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is usually referred to as "union types". The TypeScript type system does not allow for this. Two main reasons for this that I can think of.

First, it's incredibly hard to reason about. An undermentioned aspect of programming languages is the ability for humans with normal-sized brains to answer questions about what the type system means. You would ideally be able to easily answer questions like these: Is Animal|Mammal the same as Animal, or the same as Mammal? Is Dog|Cat convertible to Mammal? What's the relationship between (x: string) => number|string and (x: string|number) => string) ? It's not necessarily impossible, but isn't meeting the bar for the value it brings to the table.

Second, in a system without good runtime type information, this is sort of unusable in practice outside of a few primitive types. For example:

interface Car {
    run(fuel: string);
}
interface Human {
    run(distance: number);
}

// Makes the specified object go
public void run(obj: Car|Human, dist: number, fuel: string) {
    if( /* ??? */ ) {
        (<Car>obj).run(fuel);
    } else {
        (<Human>obj).run(dist);
    }
}

At runtime, there's no information to inform the ??? condition. The Car and Human interfaces are indistinguishable. This is the same reason the compiler doesn't let you provide wholly separate method overload implementations.

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Its allowed in functions try it I still (naively) think it can be allowed in properties. But you did answer my question. Btw. Its great to have a ts team member on stackoverflow, thanks for that. PS: my biggest concern is the slow compile, I die slowly every time it takes 5 seconds for me to see my code in action :) –  basarat Aug 2 '13 at 9:56
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Not saying this answers your question, but could you resort to something like this?

interface Foo<T>{
    bar:T;
}

function createFoo<T>(bar:T) : Foo<T>{
    return {bar:bar};
}

var sFoo = createFoo("s");
var len = sFoo.bar.length;

var bFoo = createFoo(true);
var result = bFoo.bar === true;
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+1 for a useful answer. However my usage scenario is defining typescript interfaces for things like: github.com/gruntjs/grunt-contrib-watch#optionsevent Currently I (and others) resort to any for such cases –  basarat Aug 2 '13 at 18:42
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