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I'm trying to understand the following regular expression quantifier (a is just an exemplary token here):

a{n}?

How does the question mark affect the match of the above expression? And how does it differ from the following?

a{n}

I would have expected the pattern aa{1}?a to match both aaa and aa for example. While it matches aaa, aa is not a match. The pattern a(a{1})?a does match both, so the parentheses do make a difference here.


Note: The msdn article Quantifiers in Regular Expressions states for both:

The {n} quantifier matches the preceding element exactly n times, where n is any integer.

For {n}?, it adds the following, not overly helpful part:

It is the lazy counterpart of the greedy quantifier {n}+.

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1  
What does this have to do with C#? –  Austin Henley Aug 1 '13 at 23:03
    
@AustinHenley may be he means it in context of C# Regex only. –  TheVillageIdiot Aug 1 '13 at 23:03
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It almost seems like whoever wrote that article wasn't thinking about what they were writing. How could there be a greedy vs lazy version of matching exactly n times? –  McGarnagle Aug 1 '13 at 23:14
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@McGarnagle I would understand the thinking behind an optional version (match it either exactly n times or not at all), which can be expressed by the pattern a(a{1})?a. But you're right, what's a greedy, exactly counted match? –  Marius Schulz Aug 1 '13 at 23:17
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@Mobstaa: Not in regular expressions. You should read the question before commenting or answering. :-) –  Ken White Aug 1 '13 at 23:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Nothing. The article states:

The {n} quantifier matches the preceding element exactly n times, where n is any integer. {n} is a greedy quantifier whose lazy equivalent is {n}?.

The {n}? quantifier matches the preceding element exactly n times, where n is any integer. It is the lazy counterpart of the greedy quantifier {n}+.

Notice the text is exactly the same. Basically, adding ? does not change the behavior of the quantifier. It appears that .NET's regular expression engine supports {n}? as a alternative to {n}.


Interestingly, this article does appear to contain an error:

The {n,} quantifier matches the preceding element at least n times, where n is any integer. {n,} is a greedy quantifier whose lazy equivalent is {n}?.

This is wrong. The lazy equivalent of {n,} is {n,}? which is not the same as {n}?.

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So it seems the version with the question mark ({n}?) is only implemented (and documented) for completeness because its siblings {n,}? and {n,m}? also exist? –  Marius Schulz Aug 1 '13 at 23:34
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@MariusSchulz Yes, I'd say so. The article even provides an example using {n}? but that code behaves identically if you replace it with {n}. –  p.s.w.g Aug 1 '13 at 23:36
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Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have {n}? problems. –  Marius Schulz Aug 1 '13 at 23:42

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