Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a timer set up that should run code every 10th of a second, but instead it seems to run the desired code only once. I cannot figure out what I am doing wrong. :{

    Timer timer = new Timer();

    timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {
          @Override
          public void run() {
                  System.out.println("it only prints this once");
          }
        }, 100, 100000);

Thanks in advance for your help.

share|improve this question
    
0*0*100 = 0 not an issue per say, just a lot of noise –  MadProgrammer Aug 2 '13 at 2:06
    
You are multiplying the first param by 0, it will always be zero –  PageNotFound Aug 2 '13 at 2:06
    
I took out the noise, issue still there. –  Saucymeatman Aug 2 '13 at 2:10
    
As I said, it was noise not an issue ;) –  MadProgrammer Aug 2 '13 at 2:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The last two arguments to scheduleAtFixedRate seem odd. The first one is always 0 (which is not a problem; just means that there's no delay before the first execution). The second is set to 2 minutes, not 0.1 second. The argument is supposed to be the rate in milliseconds. For 0.1 second, you should use 100, not 2*60*1000.

Try this:

timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("it only prints this once");
    }
}, 100, 100);
share|improve this answer
    
I took out the noise, issue still there. –  Saucymeatman Aug 2 '13 at 2:11
    
@user2619934 - You originally had set up the task to run once every 2 minutes, not once every 1/10 second. It's now set up to run once every 100 seconds (a little faster than once every 2 minutes, but still much more of a delay than you say you want). –  Ted Hopp Aug 2 '13 at 2:12
    
Really? That must be the issue! I thought it was measured in milliseconds. –  Saucymeatman Aug 2 '13 at 2:13
    
@user2619934 - It is measuring milliseconds. 1000 milliseconds is 1 second; 100 milliseconds is 0.1 second. You were coding as if it were microseconds. –  Ted Hopp Aug 2 '13 at 2:14
1  
This will be the accepted answer, setting the second parameter to 100 fixed it. –  Saucymeatman Aug 2 '13 at 2:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.