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The methods in Math can be invoked like a class method:

Math.cos(0)

but also can be include-d like instance method:

include Math
cos(0)

In contrast, the following modules can be invoked in one way but not the other:

module Foo
  def bar
  end
end

Foo.bar() # NoMethodError for this call
include Foo
bar()     # but this call is fine

Singleton method:

module Foo
  def self.bar
  end
end

Foo.bar() # this call is fine
include Foo
bar()     # but not this one

Any idea how to write a module like Math?

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module Foo; def bar; end; end; include Foo; Foo.bar() works fine. –  sawa Aug 2 '13 at 4:17
1  
@sawa That only works if you always include Foo after defining it, which isn't really a sanitary thing to do. –  nil Aug 2 '13 at 4:25
    
@nil Yeah, I got lost with this. Why is it working in my case? –  sawa Aug 2 '13 at 4:33
    
(I have no idea, but hypothesis:) Might be that self.class in irb is Object (assuming you tested this in irb or pry or something equivalent), so if you include Foo in irb that makes its methods instance methods on Object (the class) and means Foo acquires them as well because it's an Object? That's my guess. –  nil Aug 2 '13 at 4:36
2  
@Zanqi You shouldn't need to change "class method" to "static method" even if you see that in nil's answer. Although nil's answer is good, the wording is not. Ruby does not have a notion called "static method". People use it with inference from other languages. The word "class method" is more appropriate. –  sawa Aug 2 '13 at 4:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's what Module#module_function is for.

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There're a few ways to get singleton methods, so I'm going to go over those first. We'll get to the part that lets the include Math work in a minute. So, first, if you're in a module or class body, you can define a singleton method as a method of self, like so:

module Foo
  # Define bar as a method on self (the Foo module), thereby making
  # it a singleton method.
  def self.bar
    "baz"
  end
end

Alternatively, you can define them as methods on a module or class's singleton class:

module Foo
  # Opens the singleton class of self (the Foo module). This makes
  # bar a singleton method (see Module#define_singleton_method for
  # some more on that).
  class <<self
    def bar
      "baz"
    end
  end
end

include Math, Having Your Methods, and Eating Them Too

Thirdly, if you want methods as both instance and singleton methods, you can use extend. This allows you to include the module somewhere and call its methods without qualification or at least with differing qualification, depending on where you include the module (sort of -- that's beyond the scope of this, though). You can also extend self or extend using another module (containing instance methods) to add them as singleton methods when in a module or class body. This might sound more complicated than it probably looks:

module Foo
  def bar
    "baz"
  end

  # Extending self will add the instance methods of self as
  # methods on the object self -- which happens to be a module,
  # so you basically get class methods from the instance methods.
  extend self
end

This last case allows you to also include the module in another module or class and gain bar as an instance method as well, so what you do depends on what you need. In general, I prefer the first route if I'm just defining a singleton method and it's all I'll need. The second option is more or less equivalent, but also allows you to use alias_method and so on. Qualified access is next to godliness, as far as I'm concerned.

The third option, however, — using extend self — is good for doing what you're asking about with include Math, where you want to be able to both call a function as a singleton method (Math.cos(0)) and include the module to access and call the methods without qualifying them with the module name (cos(0)). If you want that, you can do one of the following:

  1. Define the method twice, both as a singleton method and as an instance method. This is not preferrable.
  2. Define them in another module and both include and extend using that module. This is handy if you want to use the module in multiple places.
  3. extend self. Extending using self is probably the best choice here, since it's simple, reduces duplicate code, and it's sufficient for the purpose of the question.

So there you go, instance methods and singleton methods living side-by-side in harmony, just like Holan and Hamlet.

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Thanks so much for the thorough answer. "Having your methods and eating them too" is exactly what I was hoping for. Is extend self an idiomatic way for module writers to make instance methods to also act like static? –  Zanqi Aug 2 '13 at 4:38
    
I can't comment on what is or isn't idiomatic, so I'll leave that up to someone else — that said, I've seen it used and suggested, so I assume it's common practice. Still, I can't say one way or the other — it likely comes down less to what's idiomatic and more what gets the job done in a clean way without writing repetitive code. –  nil Aug 2 '13 at 4:44

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