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const int a = 10
int *p = (int*) &a;
*p = 20;
printf("a = %d", a);

Is it possible to output either 10 or 20, depending on the compiler?

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marked as duplicate by Grijesh Chauhan, Yu Hao, H2CO3, Gilles, fedorqui Aug 2 '13 at 9:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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undefined behavior –  minicaptain Aug 2 '13 at 6:31
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I gave your question a title that summarizes its contents. Don't use such generic titles as you did, they don't help anybody. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 2 '13 at 6:46
    
@Jens Gustedt OK. Thanks. –  xiaokaoy Aug 2 '13 at 6:51
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5 Answers 5

Is it possible to output either 10 or 20, depending on the compiler?

Yes, or even nasal demons can appear. The behavior of this program is undefined, the code is ill-formed, because modifying a const object is a constraint violation.

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+ for constraint violation its called const-constraint - I like correct terminologies. –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 2 '13 at 7:15
    
@GrijeshChauhan Unrelated: thanks for the dupe links. –  user529758 Aug 2 '13 at 7:17
    
@H2CO3 I have read these answers many times. I had same confusion in past. actually question is good and obvious one. –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 2 '13 at 7:19
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As it's written, your code has undefined behavior, so yes, you could get 10 or 20 or anything else (e.g., an access violation).

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It's undefined behavior:

C11 6.7.3 Type qualifiers

If an attempt is made to modify an object defined with a const-qualified type through use of an lvalue with non-const-qualified type, the behavior is undefined. If an attempt is made to refer to an object defined with a volatile-qualified type through use of an lvalue with non-volatile-qualified type, the behavior is undefined.

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Yes it is undefined behaviour, and I think this is where is tells about it.

C99 Section 6.7.3 Paragraph 5

If an attempt is made to modify an object defined with a const-qualified type through use of an lvalue with non-const-qualified type, the behavior is undefined. If an attempt is made to refer to an object defined with a volatile-qualified type through use of an lvalue with non-volatile-qualified type, the behavior is undefined.115)

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When you do *p=20, you are trying to change the value of a constant, which is not allowed.

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