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I am new to matlab and just wondering if you guys can help me out with this problem.

For instance, I have two matrices:

A = [X1 X2 X3 X4]

B = [Y1; Y2; Y3]

now what I really want to achieve is to multiply these two matrices in this way:

[X1Y1 X2Y1 X3Y1 X4Y1; 
 X1Y2 X2Y2 X3Y2 X4Y2;
 X1Y3 X2Y3 X3Y3 X4Y3;
 .... and so on]

I tried using A(1,:).*B(:,1) but matlab is saying that matrix dimensions must agree.

I just don't know how to manipulate this on matlab but in excel is possible.

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Did you try multiplying from right by A? B().A() –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 2 '13 at 8:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a simple outer product. kron is not needed (although it will work.) bsxfun is wild overkill, although will yield what you have asked for. repmat is inappropriate, because while it will help you do what you wish, it replicates the arrays in memory, using more resources than are needed. (Avoid using inefficient programming styles when there are good ones immediately at your disposal.)

All you need use is the simple * operator.

A is a row vector. B a column vector.

C = B*A

will yield the result C(i,j)=B(i)*A(j), which is exactly what you are looking for. Note that this works because B is 3x1 and A is 1x4, so the "inner" dimensions of B and A do conform.

In MATLAB, IF you are unsure if something works, TRY IT!

A = [1 2 3 4];
B = [1;2;3];
C = B*A
ans =
     1     2     3     4
     2     4     6     8
     3     6     9    12

See that kron did indeed work, although I'd bet that use of kron here is probably less efficient than is the simple outer product multiply.

C = kron(B,A)
C =
     1     2     3     4
     2     4     6     8
     3     6     9    12

As well, bsxfun will work here too, although since we are using a general tool to do something that a basic operator will do, I'd bet it is slightly less efficient.

C = bsxfun(@times,B,A)
C =
     1     2     3     4
     2     4     6     8
     3     6     9    12

The WORST choice is repmat. Again, since it artificially replicates the vectors in memory FIRST, it must go out and grab big chunks of memory in the case of large vectors.

C = repmat(B,1,4).*repmat(A,3,1)
C =
     1     2     3     4
     2     4     6     8
     3     6     9    12

I suppose for completeness, you could also have used meshgrid or ndgrid. See that it is doing exactly what repmat did, but here it explicitly creates new matrices. Again, this is a poor programming style when there are good tools to do exactly what you wish.

[BB,AA] = ndgrid(B,A)
BB =
     1     1     1     1
     2     2     2     2
     3     3     3     3
AA =
     1     2     3     4
     1     2     3     4
     1     2     3     4

C = BB.*AA
C =
     1     2     3     4
     2     4     6     8
     3     6     9    12

What you need to understand is exactly why each of these tools COULD have been used for the job, and why they are different.

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+1, in particular for the statement In MATLAB, IF you are unsure if something works, TRY IT! SO seems to be overwhelmed by people who'd rather spend 20 minutes composing a question and hours waiting for an answer than spend 20 minutes playing around and figuring out the answer for themselves. –  High Performance Mark Aug 2 '13 at 12:22

In Matlab there is * and .* and they are very different.

* is normal matrix multiplication which is what you want i.e. B*A, note the B must come first as the inner dimension must match. You can multiply a column by a row but not a row by a column (unless they have the same number of elements).

.* is element by element multiplication in which case the matrices must be exactly the same size and shape so for example [1 2 3].*[4 5 6] = [1*4 2*5 3*6] = [4 10 18]

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Why the downvote? My answer is correct! –  Dan Aug 2 '13 at 10:00
    
Sleepy downvote removed. –  user85109 Aug 2 '13 at 10:13
    
I think that this sentence in the answer You can multiply a column by a row but not a row by a column. is incorrect. My copy of Matlab is quite happy to do both and is not, in doing so, in breach of the usual definitions of matrix/vector multiplication. –  High Performance Mark Aug 2 '13 at 12:19
    
@HighPerformanceMark No you definitely can't. Try this: A=[1,2,3,4];B=[1;2;3];A*B; you'll get the error Inner matrix dimensions must agree. But B*A will run fine. This is because in the second case the inner dimensions are both 1 but in the first case you're trying to multiply 4x3 which you can't do by definition of matrix multiplication. –  Dan Aug 2 '13 at 12:27
    
Yes you definitely can ! ... so long as the vectors are conformable, eg row (1 x n) times column (n x 1) or column(n x 1) times row (1 x m). –  High Performance Mark Aug 2 '13 at 12:38

Do not do a ".*". You should rather do a "*". The ".*" is for index by index multiplication and should have given you [X1Y1 X2Y2 X3Y3] were they vectors have been equal in size. If you do the regular multiplication "*", this is actually matrix multiplication.

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I think you just need to transpose one of the vectors. You are multiplying a column vector (A(1,:)) with a row vector (B(:,1)). This should work:

C = A(1,:).*B(:,1)';
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You can do an element by element multiplication of a row and a column, Matlab doesn't mind that (I think, I'm not 100% on that actually and not around matlab to test. Octave broadcasts so can't use it to check). But in this case the issue is that A has 4 elements while B has only 3. What the OP is after is traditional matrix multiplication i.e.B*A –  Dan Aug 2 '13 at 8:42
1  
I actually did try this in a matlab session (2010A) and did get an error when trying to do A(1,:).*B(:,1). But you're right, it seems the OP meant something else : ) –  roger Aug 2 '13 at 9:51

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