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I made simple experiment in PostgreSQL 9.1. I created test table as follows:

CREATE TABLE test
(
  id serial NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT id PRIMARY KEY (id )
)
CREATE INDEX id_idx
  ON test
  USING btree
  (id );

Then I add some data:

insert into test values(DEFAULT);
insert into test values(DEFAULT);
insert into test values(DEFAULT);
...many times :)

Now I have test table with 10'000 row in it. My first experiment is to get row by id:

explain select * from test where id = 50;

Index Scan using id_idx on test  (cost=0.00..8.27 rows=1 width=4)
  Index Cond: (id = 50)

Ok, nothing strange here. Let's make query by range of values:

explain select * from test where id >= 50;

Seq Scan on test  (cost=0.00..170.00 rows=9951 width=4)
  Filter: (id >= 50)

We got 9951 row with sequential scan, but what if I want to get only first one:

explain select * from test where id >= 50 limit 1;

Limit  (cost=0.00..0.02 rows=1 width=4)
  ->  Seq Scan on test  (cost=0.00..170.00 rows=9951 width=4)
        Filter: (id >= 50)

I expected to see index scan with rows=1, but instead I got sequential scan again(with limit after scan). Is there any way I can achieve this behavior with SQL query?

Note: I have analogous MongoDB query:

> db.test.find({'dt':{$gte:ISODate("2013-07-20T00:00:00.00Z")}}).count()
10000
> db.test.find({'dt':{$gte:ISODate("2013-07-20T00:00:00.00Z")}}).limit(1).explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor dt_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 1,
    "nscannedObjects" : 1,
    "nscanned" : 1,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 1,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 1,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 13,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "dt" : [
            [
                ISODate("2013-07-20T00:00:00Z"),
                ISODate("0NaN-NaN-NaNTNaN:NaN:NaNZ")
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "******:27017"
}

In this case MongoDB scaned only 1 document using index scan and this is great.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

First things first - the extra index is unnecessary as

NOTICE:  CREATE TABLE / PRIMARY KEY will create implicit index "id" for table "test"

Second: always run explain analyze instead of plain explain, and you get real values. In this case the table might be hot (already in memory), so SEQ SCAN is really really really fast!

Third: you did not specify any ordering, so Postgresql is free to give you any random ordering and thus any one random ID >= 50. This most probably is not what you wanted. PostgreSQL stores many tuples on a single page; and knowing the distribution of data in this case it is highly probable that on the very first page you have a tuple that has id >= 50, so the SEQ SCAN approach in this case is correct and the fastest.

Fourth: run VACUUM ANALYZE before doing any real analysis.

After VACUUM ANALYZE using EXPLAIN ANALYZE, I get:

# EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM test WHERE id >= 50 ORDER BY id LIMIT 1;
                                                     QUERY PLAN                                                      
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.00..0.03 rows=1 width=4) (actual time=0.028..0.029 rows=1 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using id on test  (cost=0.00..416.47 rows=12241 width=4) (actual time=0.027..0.027 rows=1 loops=1)
         Index Cond: (id >= 50)
 Total runtime: 0.059 ms
(4 rows)
share|improve this answer
    
but in this case you get rows=12241, not rows=1. How does it solve problem with large scans? – Artem Mezhenin Aug 2 '13 at 10:53
    
No, you don't. Read the output correctly. Actual rows = 1. – Antti Haapala Aug 2 '13 at 10:55
    
Hmm, my comment was supposed to say "you aren't reading the output correctly" :D – Antti Haapala Aug 2 '13 at 11:21

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