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I am trying to do string replacement

self.cursor.execute("select (1) from eScraperInterfaceApp_scrapeddata where productURL = '%s' limit 1") % URL

error

Unsupported operand type(s) for %: 'long' and 'unicode'

productURL is unicode so how do i replace it ... Can someone please help me

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your code is doing:

self.cursor.execute("SQL template") % URL

It should be:

self.cursor.execute("SQL template" % URL)

Change the position of ):

self.cursor.execute("select (1) from eScraperInterfaceApp_scrapeddata where productURL = '%s' limit 1" % URL)

Actually more correct way is using query parameter (to prevent SQL injection):

self.cursor.execute("select (1) from eScraperInterfaceApp_scrapeddata where productURL = %s limit 1", (URL,))
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I'd say that the preferred way should instead be called the right way, and the former one still marked as incorrect. –  Antti Haapala Aug 2 '13 at 9:45
    
Note that % formatting of strings is deprecated. If you use Python 2.6 or above, the preferred way is to use .format(). –  kqr Aug 5 '13 at 12:13
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You didn't specify what database (and DBAPI driver) you use, but PEP 249 requires DBAPI to support parameter substitution, so it would be much better to use it instead of Python string formatting.

cursor.execute(
    "select (1) from eScraperInterfaceApp_scrapeddata where productURL = %s limit 1;",
     (URL,))

(Note missing quotes around parameter placeholder, and argument as a 1-tuple).

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I believe the usual syntax is to use ? for the unknown parameter (this may be DBAPI-specific, though). –  nneonneo Aug 5 '13 at 11:58
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Move % URL inside the closing parenthesis

'%s' limit 1") % URL

to

'%s' limit 1" % URL)
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2  
though syntactically right, this is still semantically wrong as it has the possibility of SQL injection. –  Antti Haapala Aug 2 '13 at 9:43
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