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Which is safer & better & cleaner & more recommended to use?

I used:

sub insert_exec {
    my ($self, $c, $args) = @_;
    my ($params, $table, $model) = $self->_init({context => $c, args => $args});
    eval {  $model->insert($table, $params);
    };
    if ($@) {  return $c->show_error($@);  } ## error
    $c->redirect("/index");
}

But for this kind of cases (see the error part), I have been told that using Try::Tiny is better?

My question is: How would you write this and why would you choose that way?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Mark Hurd, HaskellElephant, Hobo Sapiens, drvdijk, Eric Brown Aug 2 '13 at 16:13

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Update

Thanks to an anonymous user I have been able to correct a bug in my answer. The return in the catch block wasn't having the desired effect, as it returned only from the catch subroutine.

If there was no exception, try returns the value of the try block, otherwise the value of the catch block. So this version correctly executes and returns the value of $c->redirect("/index") if the insert succeeded, otherwise it calls and returns the value of $c->show_error($_).

sub insert_exec {
  my ($self, $c, $args) = @_;
  my ($params, $table, $model) = $self->_init({context => $c, args => $args});
  try {
    $model->insert($table, $params);
    $c->redirect("/index");
  }
  catch {
    $c->show_error($_);
  };
}

Try::Tiny is pretty much essential as error handling with eval is very hard indeed to get right in the general case. The module's documentation says this

This module provides bare bones try/catch/finally statements that are designed to minimize common mistakes with eval blocks, and NOTHING else.

The main focus of this module is to provide simple and reliable error handling for those ... who still want to write correct eval blocks without 5 lines of boilerplate each time.

Your code would look like this

use Try::Tiny;

sub insert_exec {
  my ($self, $c, $args) = @_;
  my ($params, $table, $model) = $self->_init({context => $c, args => $args});
  try {
    $model->insert($table, $params);
  }
  catch {
    return $c->show_error($_);
  };
  $c->redirect("/index");
}

which I hope you'll agree is much nicer.

Two points are notable:

  • try and catch are subroutines coded to look like language words. That means a semicolon after the final closing brace is essential.

  • For the same reason, return within the try or catch blocks will not work as expected, and will simply exit the block, returning to the parent subroutine. See my update above.

  • Within the catch block $@ has its original value from before the try. The value resulting from the error is in $_

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it's much nicer indeed –  ado Aug 2 '13 at 10:02
    
An anonymous user who had insufficient reputation to post comments tried to edit my answer, adding this text. It is a very good point and I have made an appropriate update. With Try::Tiny the construction is nicer but differs substantially from original post. As you wrote try and catch blocks are subroutines, thus the return inside catch returns only from anonymous sub, not from insert_exec. It means that the redirect is performed also in case of an exception. This is a common pitfall of Try::Tiny. –  Borodin Aug 5 '13 at 15:58

It's best not to rely on $@ to signal errors, but to just use it as the source of error messages, so I would write it as:

my $success = eval { $model->insert($table, $params) };
unless ($success) {
    return $c->show_error($@);
}

If you are eval'ing something that might not return a true value on success, then:

my $success = eval { $model->insert($table, $params); 1 };

I would probably use Try::Tiny when things get more complicated than this, e.g., function returns a value you want to save, but might not be a true value (or might not even be defined), and you want to catch exceptions.

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Not using Try::Tiny saves you an additional dependancy.

Using it allows you to write code which is understandable without knowledge of Perl idioms (by replacing them with terms more commonly recognised across the industry).

You need to decide which of those is of more value to you, as it is hard to measure their relative worth objectively.

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