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I have CSV file which have more than 10 lakh data. I want to use binary::tree for less memory uses.

Main use to this program search first 5 digit and create new file(file name should be first five digit) for store data for same first five digit.

my code working fine but using high memory.

write now i using this code:

my $file = "my_csv_file.csv";

open (my $data, '<', $file) or die "Could not open '$file' $!\n";

while (my $lines = <$data>) {
        my @fields = split "," , $lines unless $. == 1;

        my $first_five = substr ($fields[1],  0,  5,);

        if (-e "$first_five.csv" ) {
            open my $fh, '>>', "$first_five.csv" or die $!;
            print { $fh } $lines;

        }       else {
            open my $fh, '>>', "$first_five.csv" or die $!;
            print $fh "Title\n";
        }               
        close $fh;
}
 close $data;
share|improve this question
    
I can't see any question here... – Vince Aug 2 '13 at 10:31
    
@Vince: how to use binary::search for shorting the data for same program? – codemania Aug 2 '13 at 10:45
    
I don't see how this uses much real memory at all, as it doesn't keep any of the input data around. It reads a line, writes it to a file and then forgets it. Perhaps you're giving Perl's garbage collector a workout by getting a fresh variable for every line, and doing all those opens and closes. – Joe Z Aug 2 '13 at 14:42
    
@JoeZ: actually in my file heavy data more than 10 lakh rows..so this program taking too much time and CPU uses also very high. any other solution.. – codemania Aug 5 '13 at 6:59
    
I can certainly see it taking a lot of CPU time, but not really much memory. The real issue is all the file opening / closing. You're doing 1,000,000 file opens/closes. You're probably better off batching this. I'll code up an example solution. – Joe Z Aug 5 '13 at 14:03
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe the performance bottleneck in your script is not memory usage at all, but rather that you open and close a file for every record. If I understood the units correctly, 10lakh is 1,000,000, so that's quite a lot of opens and closes.

One solution would be to process the data in batches, particularly if you have many repeated keys in the "first 5" that you extract as the key.

I benchmarked your program against the one below on a synthetic file containing 100 unique 5-digit keys in that second field, but 10,000,000 records (10x the size of your file). The rows looked like this:

1,9990001,----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2,9990002,----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3,9990003,----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I did this to simulate a moderately large amount of data in the input. It should be about 10x the number of records as your input file.

Your original script took over 2 minutes to process this input on my computer. The following script, using batches of 10,000 records, took 24 seconds. That's over 5x as fast.

my $file = "my_csv_file.csv";

open (my $data, '<', $file) or die "Could not open '$file' $!\n";

sub write_out
{
    my $batch = shift;

    for my $first_five (keys %$batch)
    {
        my $file_name  = $first_five . ".csv";
        my $need_title = ! -e $file_name;

        open my $fh, '>>', $file_name or die $!;
        print $fh "Title\n" if $need_title;
        print $fh @{ $batch->{$first_five} };
        close $fh;
    }
}

my ($line, $batch, $count);

$batch = { };
$count = 0;

while ($line = <$data>)
{
    next if $. == 1;

    if ($line =~ /^[^,]*,(.....)/)
    {
        push @{ $batch->{$1} }, $line;

        if (++$count > 10000)   # adjust as needed
        {
            write_out $batch;
            $batch = { };
            $count = 0;
        }
    }
}

write_out $batch if $count; # write final batch

close $data;

Now, I did notice one difference between my script's output and yours: Yours seems to drop the first line of output for each destination .csv file, putting the word Title in its place. I assume that was an error. My script above adds a row named Title, without dropping the first instance of a given "first five."

If you want the previous behavior, you can change it in sub write_out.

I did some additional experiments. I changed the batch size to 10,000,000, so that write_out only gets called once. The memory usage did grow quite a bit, and the run time only came down to 22 seconds. I also tried changing the batch size down to 100. The memory usage dropped dramatically, but the run time went up to around 30 seconds. This suggests that file open/close are the true bottleneck.

So, by changing the batch size, you can control the memory footprint vs. the run time. In any case, the batch-oriented code should be much faster than your current approach.

Edit: I did a further benchmark using a second 10 million record input, this time fully randomizing the 5-digit keys. The resulting output writes 100,000 files named 00000.csv through 99999.csv. The original script takes around 3 minutes to run, and my script above (with a batch size of 1000000) takes about 1:26, so approximately twice as fast.

The bottleneck is not the script itself, but filesystem operations. Creating / updating 100,000 files is inherently expensive.

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