Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am using XStream. At the moment it is not easy to replace XStream with something else.

I have an interface (MyInterface) and several sub-classes which implement that interface (in the sample code below, there is one called MyImplementation).

I want to serialize and deserialize instances of the sub-classes. I found that I can deserialize just fine if I put the class attribute into the XML:

<myInterfaceElement class="myPackage.MyImplementation">
  <field1>value1</field1>
  <field2>value2</field2>
</myInterfaceElement>

However, I do not know how to get XStream to write the class attribute. How can I get XStream to include the class attribute when serializing? Or is there another way to serialize/deserialize a class hierarchy so that the element name is the same for all implementations and each subclass can have their own fields defined?

Here is an example of MyInterface, MyImplementation, a JUnit test case trying to make it work. The deserializeWithClassAttribute test passes while the classAttributeSetInResult fails.


package myPackage;

public interface MyInterface {

}

package myPackage;

public class MyImplementation implements MyInterface {
    public String field1;
    public String field2;

    public MyImplementation(String field1, String field2) {
        this.field1 = field1;
        this.field2 = field2;
    }
}

package myPackage;
import org.junit.Test;

import com.thoughtworks.xstream.XStream;
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.io.xml.DomDriver;

import static org.junit.Assert.*;


public class xstreamTest {
    @Test
    public void classAttributeSetInResult() {
        MyInterface objectToSerialize = new MyImplementation("value1", "value2");

        final XStream xStream = new XStream(new DomDriver());
        xStream.alias("myInterfaceElement", MyInterface.class);

        String xmlResult = xStream.toXML(objectToSerialize).toString();

        String expectedResult = 
"<myInterfaceElement class=\"myPackage.MyImplementation\">\n" +
"  <field1>value1</field1>\n" +
"  <field2>value2</field2>\n" +
"</myInterfaceElement>";

        assertEquals(expectedResult, xmlResult);
    }

    @Test
    public void deserializeWithClassAttribute() {
        String inputXmlString = 
"<myInterfaceElement class=\"myPackage.MyImplementation\">\r\n" +
"  <field1>value1</field1>\r\n" +
"  <field2>value2</field2>\r\n" +
"</myInterfaceElement>";

        final XStream xStream = new XStream(new DomDriver());

        MyInterface result = (MyInterface)xStream.fromXML(inputXmlString);
        assertTrue("Instance of MyImplementation returned", result instanceof MyImplementation);

        MyImplementation resultAsMyImplementation = (MyImplementation)result;
        assertEquals("Field 1 deserialized", "value1", resultAsMyImplementation.field1);
        assertEquals("Field 2 deserialized", "value2", resultAsMyImplementation.field2);
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I'd use a custom converter to solve this:

Your classes/interfaces:

public static interface MyInterface {
    public String getField1();
    public String getField2();
}

public static class MyImplementation implements MyInterface {
    public String field1;
    public String field2;

    public MyImplementation(String field1, String field2) {
        this.field1 = field1;
        this.field2 = field2;
    }

    public String getField1() { return field1; }
    public String getField2() { return field2; }
}

The rather quick & dirty Converter:

public static class MyInterfaceConverter implements Converter {
    private static final String ATTR_NAME_CLASS  = "concrete-class";
    private static final String NODE_NAME_FIELD1 = "field1";
    private static final String NODE_NAME_FIELD2 = "field2";

    public boolean canConvert(Class type)
    {
        return type.equals(MyImplementation.class);
    }

    public void marshal(Object obj, HierarchicalStreamWriter writer, MarshallingContext context)
    {
        if (obj == null)
            // no need to save null-objects
            return;

        final String type = obj.getClass().getSimpleName();
        final MyInterface myInterface;
        if (obj instanceof MyImplementation)
            myInterface = (MyInterface) obj;
        // else if (...)
        //      ...
        else
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Cannot convert objects of type " + obj.getClass());

        writer.addAttribute(ATTR_NAME_CLASS, type);
        marshalAttribute(writer, context, NODE_NAME_FIELD1, myInterface.getField1());
        marshalAttribute(writer, context, NODE_NAME_FIELD2, myInterface.getField2());
    }

    private static void marshalAttribute(HierarchicalStreamWriter writer, MarshallingContext context, String attrName, Object val)
    {
        if (val != null) {
            writer.startNode(attrName);
            context.convertAnother(val);
            writer.endNode();
        }
    }

    public Object unmarshal(HierarchicalStreamReader reader,
            UnmarshallingContext context)
    {
        final String type = reader.getAttribute(ATTR_NAME_CLASS);
        String field1Value = null, field2Value = null;
        while (reader.hasMoreChildren()) {
            reader.moveDown();
            if (NODE_NAME_FIELD1.equals(reader.getNodeName()))
                field1Value = (String)context.convertAnother(null, String.class);
            else if (NODE_NAME_FIELD2.equals(reader.getNodeName()))
                field2Value = (String)context.convertAnother(null, String.class);
            reader.moveUp();
        }

        if (MyImplementation.class.getSimpleName().equals(type)) {
            return new MyImplementation(field1Value, field2Value);
        }
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Cannot unmarshal objects of type " + type);
    }
}

The test/usage/XStream-Initialization:

@Test
public void classAttributeSetInResult() {
    MyInterface objectToSerialize = new MyImplementation("value1", "value2");

    final XStream xStream = new XStream(new DomDriver());
    xStream.alias("myInterfaceElement", MyImplementation.class);
    // xStream.alias("myInterfaceElement", OtherImplementation.class);
    xStream.registerConverter(new MyInterfaceConverter());

    String xmlResult = xStream.toXML(objectToSerialize).toString();

    String expectedResult = 
"<myInterfaceElement concrete-class=\"MyImplementation\">\r\n" +
"  <field1>value1</field1>\r\n" +
"  <field2>value2</field2>\r\n" +
"</myInterfaceElement>";

    assertEquals(expectedResult, xmlResult);
}

@Test
public void deserializeWithClassAttribute() {
    String inputXmlString = 
"<myInterfaceElement concrete-class=\"MyImplementation\">\r\n" +
"  <field1>value1</field1>\r\n" +
"  <field2>value2</field2>\r\n" +
"</myInterfaceElement>";

    final XStream xStream = new XStream(new DomDriver());
    xStream.alias("myInterfaceElement", MyImplementation.class);
    // xStream.alias("myInterfaceElement", OtherImplementation.class);
    xStream.registerConverter(new MyInterfaceConverter());

    MyInterface result = (MyInterface)xStream.fromXML(inputXmlString);
    assertTrue("Instance of MyImplementation returned", result instanceof MyImplementation);

    MyImplementation resultAsMyImplementation = (MyImplementation)result;
    assertEquals("Field 1 deserialized", "value1", resultAsMyImplementation.field1);
    assertEquals("Field 2 deserialized", "value2", resultAsMyImplementation.field2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks MrD. This looks like it would work if, for every new implementation of the MyInterface interface, I modify MyInterfaceConverter. Since each implementation can also have it's own field's properties, it also means that MyInterfaceConverter would need that intimate knowledge about all of those implementations. I don't think that's practical for my needs. I wonder if there is a way to do it with a little more reflection? But supposing I add in that reflections, isn't that really duplicating what XStream is supposed to be doing for me? –  dennislloydjr Aug 2 '13 at 18:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured this out by doing the following (thanks to McD on the hint to use a Converter):

  1. Add a custom Converter that extends ReflectionConverter:

    package myPackage;

    import com.thoughtworks.xstream.converters.MarshallingContext; import com.thoughtworks.xstream.converters.reflection.ReflectionConverter; import com.thoughtworks.xstream.converters.reflection.ReflectionProvider; import com.thoughtworks.xstream.io.HierarchicalStreamWriter; import com.thoughtworks.xstream.mapper.Mapper;

    public class MyInterfaceConverter extends ReflectionConverter {

    public MyInterfaceConverter(Mapper mapper, ReflectionProvider reflectionProvider) {
        super(mapper, reflectionProvider);
    }
    
    @Override
    public void marshal(Object original, final HierarchicalStreamWriter writer, final MarshallingContext context) {
        writer.addAttribute("class", original.getClass().getCanonicalName());
        super.marshal(original, writer, context);
    }
    
    @SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
    @Override
    public boolean canConvert(Class type) {
        return MyInterface.class.isAssignableFrom(type);
    }
    

    }

  2. Registering the new Converter when I setup xStream:

    @Test
    public void classAttributeSetInResult() {
        MyInterface objectToSerialize = new MyImplementation("value1", "value2");
    
        final XStream xStream = new XStream(new DomDriver());
        xStream.alias("myInterfaceElement", MyImplementation.class);
        xStream.registerConverter(new MyInterfaceConverter(xStream.getMapper(), xStream.getReflectionProvider()));
    
        String xmlResult = xStream.toXML(objectToSerialize).toString();
    
        String expectedResult = 
    

    "\n" + " value1\n" + " value2\n" + "";

        assertEquals(expectedResult, xmlResult);
    }
    

Hopefully this will help someone else down the road. If anyone has a better idea, please let me know!

share|improve this answer
    
of course, you're right. Using the "standard" XStream-serialization-mechanisms for simple classes like these ones is much better. I picked my example from a more complicated class where I needed the custom converters. –  MrD Aug 5 '13 at 7:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.