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This is a DLL project in C# in VS 2010. My project is set to target .NET 3.5, but when I check my DLL after compile, using Reflector, it says it is .NET 2.0.

My only clue is that I'm referencing a DLL that is .NET 2.0.

Can someone explain this behavior?

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I don't think the core .NET libraries have changed from 2.0 - the newer .NET versions just add new libraries - I could be wrong though –  Drew McGowen Aug 2 '13 at 15:49
    
"As with .NET Framework 3.0, version 3.5 uses Common Language Runtime (CLR) 2.0, that is, the same version as .NET Framework version 2.0. " - wikipedia –  Greg Aug 2 '13 at 15:50
    
Where do you see the reference to 2.0 in Reflector app? –  Steve Aug 2 '13 at 15:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is not the way it works. An assembly targets a CLR version. Version 2.0.50727 for any project that targets .NET 2.0 through 3.5 SP1. Which are not side-by-side versions, 3.0, 3.5 and 3.5SP1 just added extra assemblies. They still use the same CLR and the same base class assemblies.

Until .NET 4.0, an entirely new version of .NET with a new version of the CLR. Version 4.0.30319. And it is a side-by-side version, you can have both .NET 4 and .NET 3.5SP1 installed on the machine.

.NET 4.5 is again an update which replaces 4.0 and uses the same CLR version.

The use of setting the .NET Framework target version in your project is to help catch the IDE you accidentally using assemblies that are only available in a later release. You could still build your project but of course it isn't going to run on the user's machine. You want to know about that.

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That added clarity really helps. Thank you. –  Ducain Aug 2 '13 at 16:00

.NET 3.5 is a series of extensions that build on the .NET 2.0 framework, but the underlying runtime is still the same as in .NET 2.0. So the DLL shows as .NET 2.0 because it is compiled for the .NET 2.0 runtime.

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This MSDN page has a good image showing how the CLR does not necessarily match the .NET version. –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 2 '13 at 15:54
    
Excellent. Thanks all. –  Ducain Aug 2 '13 at 15:56

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