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I have a class which has 2 members:

RequestController {
  public:
    SendRequest();  // called by multiple threads synchronously
  private:
    server primary;   // This is the primary server
    server backup;    // This is the back up server.
}

My logic is simply this:

In SendRequest(), I want to send the request to primary server, if it fails, I want to send it to backup server, if it passes, I want to swap primary server and backup server.

Here the problem comes: when I do the swapping, I have to lock the primary and backup (this is the place where multiple threads can not do at the same time). Actually I need to make sure when I swap, no threads are reading primary server. How do I write this piece of code in an efficient way? I don't want to lock the whole thing, as for most of the case, primary server works and there's no need to lock.

I think generally this problem is language independent. Anyway I tag this with C++.

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You might get more help if you tag this with the language or system or something specific. –  Lee Meador Aug 2 '13 at 16:51

1 Answer 1

Lets assume that the servers take some non-negligible amount of time to process a request. Then if the requests are coming fast enough, you will have the case where SendRequest is called a second time while it is waiting for one of the servers to processes a previous request.

As a designer, you have two choices.

  1. If it is OK for a server to process multiple requests simultaneously, then you do nothing.
  2. If a server can only process a single request at a time, then you will need to perform some kind of synchronization on the code.

In case 2, since you already have a lock on the servers, you can swap them with no ramifications.

For case 1, why not do the following:

std::mutex my_mutex;
...
// Select the server
server* selected = NULL;
my_mutex.lock();
  selected = &primary;
my_mutex.unlock();

// Let the selected server process the message.
bool success = selected->process();

// If there was a primary failure, see if we can try the backup.
if (!success) {
  my_mutex.lock();
  if (selected == &primary) {
    selected = &backup;
  }
  my_mutex.unlock();

  // Now try again
  success = selected->process();

  // If the backup was used successfully, swap the primary and backup.
  if (success) {
    my_mutex.lock();
    if (selected == &backup) {
      backup = primary;
      primary = selected;
    }
    my_mutex.unlock();    
  }
}

But this could have some problems. Say for example that primary fails on the first message, but is successful on the rest. If SendRequest() is called at the same time by 3 different threads, then you could have the following:

  • Thread 1 - sends with primary
  • Thread 2 - sends with primary
  • Thread 3 - sends with primary
  • Thread 1 - fails, sends with backup
  • Thread 2 - primary succeeds
  • Thread 1 - backup succeeds
  • Thread 1 - swaps primary and backup
  • Thread 3 - old primary (new backup) succeeds
  • Thread 3 - swaps primary and backup

If the messages keep coming fast enough, it is possible to remain in this state where you keep swapping primary and backup. The condition would resolve the moment there are no pending messages, and then the primary and backup would be set until there is another failure.

Perhaps a better way would be to never swap, but have a better selection method. For example:

...
// Select the server
server* selected = NULL;
selected = &primary;
if (!primary.last_message_successful) {
  // The most recent attempt made with primary was a failure.
  if (backup.last_message_successful) {
    // The backup is thought to be functioning.
    selected = &backup;
  }
}

// Let the selected server process the message.
// If successful, process() will set the last_message_successful boolean.
bool success = selected->process();

// If there was a failure, try the other one.
if (!success) {
  if (&primary == selected) {
    selected = &backup;
  } else {
    selected = &primary;
  }
}

// Try again with the other one.
selected->process();

In this example, the lock is not necessary. Primary will be used until it fails. Then the backup will be used. If other messages are processed in the mean time, it may result in the primary becoming usable again, in this case it will be used. Otherwise, backup will b used until it fails. If both fail, they will both be attempted, first primary, and then backup.

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For my case, 1 is correct. The server is able to process multiple requests at the same time. –  WhatABeautifulWorld Aug 2 '13 at 17:28
    
I don't see how this fits his requirements though that no threads may be reading the primary server. The lock used when swapping isn't held during either call to process(). –  Joe Runde Aug 2 '13 at 17:35
    
@Joe Runde As OP just said, the lock doesn't need to be held during the call to process() since the server is able to process multiple requests at the same time. –  Trenin Aug 2 '13 at 17:41
    
@Joe Runde Hmm... Depends what is meant by "reading the primary server". I took it to mean accessing the primary field, which the lock definitely does. But if it means performing actions with the server, then that contradicts what OP said about being able to process multiple messages. –  Trenin Aug 2 '13 at 17:51
    
@Trenin I assumed his quandary was that multiple threads could be using the server to process a request, except when he needed to swap servers. Given that there's no implementation details at all and OP's not responding, I don't think we can help –  Joe Runde Aug 2 '13 at 18:46

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