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Let us assume that we have a Login Screen for an app. The Login Screen implements a UITableViewController, which contains a UITableView. The UITableView has 1 section, and the section contains two cells (see storyboard below).

Storyboard

Current behavior

When the user begins editing the email field - with the placeholder ENTER YOUR EMAIL - the keyboard overlaps the password field - with the placeholder ENTER YOUR PASSWORD.

Password field is not visiblePassword field is visible when editing password

Desired behavior:

When the user begins editing the email field, the keyboard should overlap neither field and the keyboard should sit below both fields.

Attempted solution

I have attempted to use the following in my LoginFormController : UITableViewController to force the UITableView to scroll to the appropriate position, to no avail:

-(BOOL) textFieldSHouldBeginEditing:(RCTextField *)textField
{
    [[self.view viewWithTag:textField.tag+1] becomeFirstResponder];

    // get the scroll index path of the last row in the first section
    NSIndexPath *scrollIndexPath = [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:1 inSection:0];

    // scroll the view there
    [[self tableView] scrollToRowAtIndexPath:scrollIndexPath
                            atScrollPosition:UITableViewScrollPositionBottom animated:YES];

    return YES;
}

My LoginFormController : UITableViewController interface:

//
//  LoginFormController.h
//  Zealoushacker
//
//  Created by Alex Notov on 7/31/13.
//  Copyright (c) 2013 Zealoushacker, Inc. All rights reserved.
//

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface LoginFormController : UITableViewController <UITextFieldDelegate>

@end

The LoginFormController of course has a reference to a tableView.

share|improve this question
    
None of the approaches in the solutions below address the problem of the rest of the content scrolling, vs glitching into place. The solutions in this thread seem to look more graceful than anything in the answers below, but also don't work quite as desired:stackoverflow.com/questions/16547549/… –  zealoushacker Aug 2 '13 at 20:20

4 Answers 4

You may try to add TPKeyboardAvoiding to your project

TPKeyboardAvoiding - A drop-in universal solution for moving text fields out of the way of the keyboard in iOS.

For use with UITableViewController classes, drop TPKeyboardAvoidingTableView.m and TPKeyboardAvoidingTableView.h into your project, and make your UITableView a TPKeyboardAvoidingTableView in the xib.

Check the Sample

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, so I don't have a UIScrollView anywhere in my code... I am using a UITableView, precisely because it's supposed to handle all the scrolling for me :( –  zealoushacker Aug 2 '13 at 18:16
    
While your solution might work, it doesn't really answer my question, as I am really trying to completely grok how to get what I have to work, rather than looking for an alternative solution. –  zealoushacker Aug 2 '13 at 18:16
1  
TPKeyboardAvoiding has a UITableView Solution as well...updating my answer –  icodebuster Aug 2 '13 at 18:17
    
Thanks, I will give that alternative solution a shot. In the meantime, I'd like to see if I can get an answer to the exact question I posed. –  zealoushacker Aug 2 '13 at 18:23
    
I attempted to use it by my use case is unique in that I have 3 static table view cells, which are very large. TableView does not properly scroll to them and neither does TPKeyboardAvoiding, so looks like I get to build my own solution. –  Stuart P. Jan 15 '14 at 16:59

The reason your scrollToRowAtIndexPath isn't working is that the keyboard isn't taking up any space at that point, so when you tell the table view to make those cells visible, they already are.

What you want to do is call setContentOffset and pass in the text field's origin minus an offset (to move the field down a bit), something like this (although you probably want to animate it with setContentOffset:animated:):

-(BOOL) textFieldSHouldBeginEditing:(RCTextField *)textField
{
    CGRect frame = [textField frame];
    [[self tableView] setContentOffset:CGPointMake(frame.origin.x, frame.origin.y - 5.0f)];
    return MAYBE;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, Apple's sample code for Moving Content That Is Under the Keyboard uses content offsets and a scroll view. –  Marcus Adams Aug 2 '13 at 18:40
    
I see you've updated it to - 5.0f, vs + 5.0f... neither works for me for some reason. :( Going to take a break and try again. –  zealoushacker Aug 2 '13 at 18:43
    
Yeah, I typed out +5 originally but that pushes the text field up instead of down. That's only to make the field not sit right at the edge of the screen, it should still reposition without it. –  Turch Aug 2 '13 at 18:47
1  
Some other questions indicate that setContentOffset will only work with a table view if animate is YES - I had done this with scroll views and assumed it would work the same with table views since they are a subclass, but I guess not. The animated version should still work for you since I assume you want the scrolling to be animated. –  Turch Aug 2 '13 at 18:53
    
This does not seem to work... and I don't think that MAYBE is defined as a const. –  zealoushacker Aug 2 '13 at 20:03

This is ugly because I'm not taking the time to be as refined as @Turch ... I just crudely use the number 100 but feel free to refine it ... overall it works.

-(BOOL) textFieldShouldBeginEditing:(RCTextField *)textField
{
    // ***HACK*** here part 1
    if (textField == self.email) {
        CGRect frame = self.tableView.frame;
        float moveUpTo = self.tableView.frame.origin.y - 100.0f;
        if (self.tableView.frame.origin.y == 0.0f) {
            frame.origin.y = moveUpTo;
            self.tableView.frame = frame;
        }
    }
    return YES;
}

-(BOOL) textFieldShouldReturn:(UITextField *)textField {
    ...
        [textField resignFirstResponder];

        // ***HACK*** here part 2
        CGRect frame = self.tableView.frame;
        float moveDownTo = self.tableView.frame.origin.y + 100.0f;
        if (self.tableView.frame.origin.y != 0.0f) {
            frame.origin.y = moveDownTo;
            self.tableView.frame = frame;
        }

        return YES;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You could just use self.email.frame.size.height * 2 instead of 100 :) –  zealoushacker Aug 2 '13 at 19:59
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After considering all answers, I've come up with my own, based on the ones below, which I find to be quite clean.

I've implemented a category LoginFormController+Scrolling.h:

//
//  LoginFormController+Scrolling.h
//  Zealoushacker
//
//  Created by Alex Notov on 8/2/13.
//  Copyright (c) 2013 Zealoushacker, Inc. All rights reserved.
//

#import "LoginFormController.h"

typedef enum {
    UITableViewBottom = 0,
    UITableViewTop = 1
} UITableViewPosition ;

@interface LoginFormController (Scrolling)
-(void)moveLoginFormToTableView:(UITableViewPosition)p;
@end

and its implementation LoginFormController+Scrolling.m:

//
//  LoginFormController+Scrolling.m
//  Zealoushacker
//
//  Created by Alex Notov on 8/2/13.
//  Copyright (c) 2013 Zealoushacker, Inc. All rights reserved.
//

#import "LoginFormController+Scrolling.h"

@implementation LoginFormController (Scrolling)
- (float)heightOfAllCells {
    float height = 0;
    for (UIView *subview in self.tableView.subviews)
    {
        if ([subview isKindOfClass:[UITableViewCell self]])
        {
            height += subview.frame.size.height;
        }
    }
    return height;
}

-(void)moveLoginFormToTableView:(UITableViewPosition)p
{
    // this is adapted from:
    // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/18023457/how-may-i-scroll-a-uitableview-to-the-second-uitextfield-when-the-first-uitextfi/18023825
    CGRect frame = self.tableView.frame;

    if (p == UITableViewBottom && self.tableView.frame.origin.y == 0.0f) {
        frame.origin.y -= [self heightOfAllCells];
    } else if (p == UITableViewTop && self.tableView.frame.origin.y != 0.0f) {
        frame.origin.y += [self heightOfAllCells];

    }
    self.tableView.frame = frame;
}
@end

Then, in my LoginFormController.m, I may simply call [self moveLoginFormToTableView:UITableViewBottom]; to scroll to the bottom of the UITableView, regardless of how many UITableViewCell components it has, and conversely call [self moveLoginFormToTableView:UITableViewTop]; to scroll it back to its original position.

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