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I am trying to create a text adventure game in python. I am using randint to create a number between 0 and 2 and when I use an if statement to take the random number and assign the biome variable to a biome type it instead takes the original version of the variable and uses that as the biome.

#Defines game()
print ('''You are in a %s biome.'''%(biome))
biome='placeholder'
import random
trees=random.randint(0,50)
biomes=random.randint(0,2)
animals=random.randint(0,3)
wolves=random.randint(0,5)
if biomes == "0":
    biome='Forest'

if biomes == "1":
    biome='Taiga'

if biomes == "2":
    biome='Mountain'

print ('''You are in a %s biome.'''%(biome))
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The answers to your question are correct, but Python makes this even easier with random.choice: biome = random.choice(['Forest', 'Taiga', 'Mountain']) –  kevingessner Aug 2 '13 at 18:40
    
@user2438758, Accept the answer. –  falsetru Aug 2 '13 at 19:11
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6 Answers

biomes is int value. "0" is string value.

Both values never can be equal.

>>> 0 == "0"
False

Use int literal.

if biomes == 0:
    biome = 'Forest'
elif biomes == 1:
    biome = 'Taiga'
elif biomes == 2: # else
    biome = 'Mountain'

I recommed you to use random.choice as other suggested. Simple, eaiser to read.

>>> random.choice(['Forest', 'Taiga', 'Mountain'])
'Mountain'
>>> random.choice(['Forest', 'Taiga', 'Mountain'])
'Mountain'
>>> random.choice(['Forest', 'Taiga', 'Mountain'])
'Taiga'
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1  
You don't need three seperate if conditions here. :) –  Sukrit Kalra Aug 2 '13 at 18:39
    
it's even better as a dict. . . biome_map = {0: 'forest', 1: 'taiga', : 'mountain'} then it's just biome = biome_map.get(biomes) –  GoingTharn Aug 2 '13 at 18:48
    
@GoingTharn, random.choice(..) is more pythoic as other suggest. –  falsetru Aug 2 '13 at 18:50
    
@GoingTharn, And list/tuple is enough. (['Forest', 'Tiaga', 'Mountain']) Because index is continuous (0, 1, 2 only). –  falsetru Aug 2 '13 at 18:52
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random.randint(...) returns an integer. You are comparing the value to a string here.

>>> type(randint(0, 2))
<type 'int'>

Your if statements should be rewritten as -

if biomes == 0:
    biome='Forest'
elif biomes == 1:
    biome='Taiga'
else:
    biome='Mountain'

P.S-- You don't need three if statements, since, if the value is 0, it can never be 1 or 2, so no need to check the conditions. You can use an if-elif-else construct instead.

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Here's a more understandable way:

from random import choice
biomes = ['Forest', 'Tiaga', 'Mountain']
biome = choice(biomes)

Then if the number of biomes increases, or decreases, you don't have to worry about updating the range for the random number, and not quite getting your if statements right...

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You need to compare to 0 rather than the string value"0" as in if biome == 0:

However, this can be simplified with random.choice to select a biome randomly from a list.

biome = random.choice(['Forest', 'Taiga', 'Mountain'])

and eliminate your ifs altogether.

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I think you should try in the if statement biome == 1 instead of biome == "1" and the same for biome == 2 and biome == 3.

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That's because you are comparing an integer value to a string (which will never equal). This will work:

import random
trees=random.randint(0,50)
biomes=random.randint(0,2)
animals=random.randint(0,3)
wolves=random.randint(0,5)

# Compare biomes (which is an integer) to another integer
if biomes == 0:
    biome='Forest'

# Use elif for multiple comparisons like that
elif biomes == 1:
    biome='Taiga'

# Use an else here because the only other option is 2
else:
    biome='Mountain'

print ('''You are in a %s biome.'''%(biome))

Note also I removed the first and second lines of your script. The first would have blown up because biome isn't defined yet and the second does nothing.

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