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When I try to create a class instance with a virtual method and pass it to pthread_create, I get a race condition, causing the caller to sometimes call the base method instead of the derived method like it should. After googling pthread vtable race, I found out this is fairly well-known behavior. My question is, what's a good way to get around it?

The code below exhibits this behavior at any optimization setting. Note that the MyThread object is completely constructed before being passed to pthread_create.

#include <errno.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct Thread {
    pthread_t thread;

    void start() {
    	int s = pthread_create(&thread, NULL, callback, this);
    	if (s) {
    		fprintf(stderr, "pthread_create: %s\n", strerror(errno));
    		exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    	}
    }
    static void *callback(void *ctx) {
    	Thread *thread = static_cast<Thread*> (ctx);
    	thread->routine();
    	return NULL;
    }
    ~Thread() {
    	pthread_join(thread, NULL);
    }

    virtual void routine() {
    	puts("Base");
    }
};

struct MyThread : public Thread {
    virtual void routine() {

    }
};

int main() {
    const int count = 20;
    int loop = 1000;

    while (loop--) {
    	MyThread *thread[count];
    	int i;
    	for (i=0; i<count; i++) {
    		thread[i] = new MyThread;
    		thread[i]->start();
    	}
    	for (i=0; i<count; i++)
    		delete thread[i];
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Just out of curiosity, why are you declaring those "classes" as structs? –  mrduclaw Nov 26 '09 at 9:05
1  
struct means the same thing except it makes all members public by default. –  Joey Adams Nov 26 '09 at 9:25
1  
@mrduclaw: Don't worry. That's just a fad I observed recently to use struct instead of class. It'll pass. :-P –  Tomek Szpakowicz Nov 26 '09 at 9:59
1  
@GMan: I use struct if I intend to use it just like normal dumb C struct. Otherwise I use class. –  Tomek Szpakowicz Nov 26 '09 at 10:10
1  
I use a struct when it saves me typing: If the first members are going to be public, I usually make it struct, and then add a private: further down. Anyway, they're basically equivalent. –  jalf Nov 26 '09 at 13:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The only problem here is that you are deleting the objects before the spawned thread executes the method, so by that time the child destructor already fired and the object is not there anymore.

So it has nothing to do with pthread_create or whatever, its your timing, you can't spawn a thread, give it some resources and delete them before he has the chance of using them.

Try this, it'll show how the objs are destructed by main thread before spawned thread uses them:

struct Thread {
pthread_t thread;
bool deleted;

void start() {
    deleted=false;
    int s = pthread_create(&thread, NULL, callback, this);
    if (s) {
            fprintf(stderr, "pthread_create: %s\n", strerror(errno));
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
}
static void *callback(void *ctx) {
    Thread *thread = static_cast<Thread*> (ctx);
    thread->routine();
    return NULL;
}
~Thread() {
    pthread_join(thread, NULL);
}

virtual void routine() {
    if(deleted){
        puts("My child deleted me");
    }
    puts("Base");
}
};

struct MyThread : public Thread {
virtual void routine() {

}
~MyThread(){
    deleted=true;
}

};

In the other hand if you just place a sleep in main before deleting them you'll never have that problem because the spawned thread is using valid resources.

int main() {
const int count = 20;
int loop = 1000;

while (loop--) {
    MyThread *thread[count];
    int i;
    for (i=0; i<count; i++) {
            thread[i] = new MyThread;
            thread[i]->start();
    }
    sleep(1);
    for (i=0; i<count; i++)
            delete thread[i];
}

return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that was it! Nice catch, and great answer! –  Joey Adams Nov 26 '09 at 10:02
2  
Yes. It makes it harder to hit race condition because thanks to sleep(1) thread in example will finish before delete thread[i]. But not impossible. You still can get situation when the thread routine() doesn't finish (or even start) before destructor is called. So it will try to use partially destroyed object which will trigger the problem. The proper solution is to destroy object only after the call to pthread_join confirms thread has finished. –  Tomek Szpakowicz Nov 26 '09 at 10:08
1  
Its a matter of either giving the spawned thread enough time or ensure it has already done its job before deleting resources, its just resources dependency. –  Arkaitz Jimenez Nov 26 '09 at 10:10
    
How much time is enough? –  Tomek Szpakowicz Nov 26 '09 at 10:15
3  
Tomek's right. Adding a sleep is never a robust fix for a race condition. There is no guarantee that those other threads will run at all during the sleep: maybe the machine is running some other program which just so happens to eat up that entire second. If you want to check that a thread has completed, then that's what join does. Nothing else does it. –  Steve Jessop Nov 26 '09 at 12:34

Do not do pthread_join (or any other real work) in destructor. Add join() method to Thread and call it before delete thread[i] in main.

If you try to call pthread_join in destructor, thread may be still executing Thread::routine(). Which means it's using object that is already partially destroyed. What will happen? Who knows? Hopefully program will crash quickly.


Additionally:

  • If you wish to inherit from Thread, Thread::~Thread should be declared virtual.

  • Check for all errors and handle them properly (which BTW cannot be done inside destructor).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry. I mixed up both versions while writing answer. I deleted parts that don't apply. –  Tomek Szpakowicz Nov 26 '09 at 10:11
    
+1 for taking join out of the base class destructor. –  Steve Jessop Nov 26 '09 at 12:35
    
Assuming it is done correctly, join is precisely the right thing to do in a constructor. Saying not to do any real work in a destructor is just silly. It is there for a purpose. To guarantee that certain tasks are carried out, without relying on the programmer to explicitly call cleanup functions. –  jalf Nov 26 '09 at 13:49
1  
@jalf: In this situation it is plainly a mistake. Role of the pthread_join call is to make sure thread executing Thread::routine() is finished before Thread object is destroyed. But if it's called in Thread's destructor it is simply too late. If thread is still running, it is already using partially destructed object (MyThread's destructor already finished). You can avoid this problem by putting pointer to thread object in some kind of guard object and call Thread::join() i guard's destructor (RAII pattern). –  Tomek Szpakowicz Nov 26 '09 at 14:03
    
Indeed, what I decided to do is make Thread have no constructors or destructors, instead having void beginThread(), void endThread(), and virtual void onThread(). Subclasses are then expected to call the appropriate functions in their own constructors and destructors. Moreover, it seems quite elegant when used as a mixin. –  Joey Adams Nov 26 '09 at 17:53

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