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I have a small function that creates a cumulative distribution plot that I run on a dataset using lapply (dataset is a list broken down by analyte). I would like the function to label the plots "a)" through "g)", but can't seem to figure out how to get lapply to generate the sequential lettering. Any ideas? Code below.

cdf.int <- function(data.set) {
  plot(ecdf(log10(data.set$CONC_CALC)), main = "", xlim = c(-3.0, 3.0))
  text(-4, 1.2, "a)", xpd = TRUE)
}

pdf(paste("output/figures/CDF_RegionalData.pdf", sep = ""), 
  height = 11, width = 8)
par(las = 1, omi = c(0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 1.0), mfrow = c(5, 2), ps = 10, family = "sans", mar = c(3.0, 3.0, 3.0, 3.0))
lapply(split.rd, cdf.int) 
dev.off() 
share|improve this question
    
Why don't you use a for loop? I think it would be a more natural choice here, because you don't need a return value. – Roland Aug 2 '13 at 20:50
1  
Definitely could do that and that was my first instinct. I've been trying to move towards using the apply functions, rather than using a for loop. I might just do that to get through this, but am still interested in if there is a solution to this using lapply. It would simplify my code in the future as developing series of plots is pretty typical in my work. – sinclairjesse Aug 2 '13 at 20:59
4  
There is no reason to shun for loops. They have their place. Of course you could do lapply(seq_along(split.rd), modifiedFunction), where the modified function uses the index, but that's just a for loop made more complicated. – Roland Aug 2 '13 at 21:06
    
Thanks Roland, that makes sense. – sinclairjesse Aug 2 '13 at 21:16

This is the an example of the downside of using lapply/sapply ... the names of list elements do not get passed to the function, only the values do. So you can get around that when using lapply by working with names(yourlist) (or perhaps 1:length(yourlist)) and pulling from 'yourlist' with :

  lapply(names(yourlist), function(x){ plot( yourlist[[x]] } )

In your case that does mean you will need to rewrite your function.

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this works like a dream

cdf.int <- function(n) {
  plot(rnorm(10), main = paste0(letters[n], ")"), xlim = c(-3.0, 3.0))
  text(-4, 1.2, "a)", xpd = TRUE)
}

pdf("test.pdf", height = 11, width = 8)
par(las = 1, omi = c(0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 1.0), mfrow = c(5, 2), ps = 10, family = "sans", mar = c(3.0, 3.0, 3.0, 3.0))

lapply(1:6, cdf.int) 
dev.off()

A (just a little) more realistic example using mapply

ll <- list(a=rnorm(10),
           b=rnorm(10))

cdf.int <- function(data, name) {
  plot(data, main = name, xlim = c(-3.0, 3.0))
  text(-4, 1.2, "a)", xpd = TRUE)
}

pdf("test.pdf", height = 11, width = 8)
par(las = 1, omi = c(0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 1.0), mfrow = c(2, 1), ps = 10, family = "sans", mar = c(3.0, 3.0, 3.0, 3.0))

mapply(cdf.int, ll, names(ll)) 
dev.off() 
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