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I am a newbie to python and I am trying to use multiprocessing for one my applications. I actually have a very simple multiplication program and I was trying to asynchronously generate parallel processes to calculate the multiplication of a range of numbers. When I try to do this without pooling, the time is atleast twice or some times even 4 times faster. I am not sure what could the reason be for this behavior.

I am using python 2.7.1

Non-Pool.py

#!/usr/bin/python

import time

def f(x):
        return x*x

st = time.time()
t = 10000000
f(t)
map(f, range(t))

et = time.time()
tt = (str((et-st)%60)+'--'+str((et-st/60)))

print tt

Pool.py

#!/usr/bin/python

from multiprocessing import Pool
import time

def f(x):
        return x*x

st = time.time()
t = 10000000

if __name__ == '__main__':
    pool = Pool(processes=4)              # start 4 worker processes
    result = pool.apply_async(f, [t])    # evaluate "f(10)" asynchronously
    result.get(timeout=1)           # prints "100" unless your computer is *very* slow
    pool.map(f, range(t))          # prints "[0, 1, 4,..., 81]"

et = time.time()
tt = (str((et-st)%60)+'--'+str((et-st/60)))

print tt

exit(0)

Execution Times: (Format >> minutes--seconds)

Macha-MacBook-Pro:Downloads me$ ./nonpool.py 
2.03456997871--1352551406.28
Macha-MacBook-Pro:Downloads me$ ./pool.py 
4.69528508186--1352551417.28
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Probably because the cost of creating and communicating with subprocesses is quite a bit higher than just doing the operation in-process. (You will likely see a performance boost only when doing something more complicated than "square a number.") The elapsed time will also heavily depend on the number of processors/cores you have available -- the number of worker processes you create should typically be the same as the number of processors in the computer. –  cdhowie Aug 2 '13 at 20:52

1 Answer 1

You might check related answers, e.g., python prime crunching: processing pool is slower? -- the overhead of setting up a processing pool is high, but so is sending and receiving single integers in arguments and results.

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