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I have created custom exception class

public class Web2PDFException : Exception
{
    public Web2PDFException(string message,
       Exception innerException)
        : base(message, innerException)
    {
    }
}

In my application I want to find out is throw exception is my custom exception or not.

try
{
}
catch (Exception err)
{
//Find exception type here
}
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

either

try
{
}
catch ( Web2PDFException ex )
{
}

or (if you need to write a general handler - which is generally a bad idea, but if you're sure it's best for you, you're sure):

 if( err is Web2PDFException)
 {
 }

or (in certain cases if you need to do some more complex type hierarchy stuff that cant be expressed with is)

 if( err.GetType().IsAssignableFrom(typeof(Web2PDFException)))
 {
 }

or switch to VB.NET and use is or Type.IsAssignableFrom in Exception Filters

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if( err is Web2PDFException) is that I needed :) –  Tomas Nov 26 '09 at 9:41
    
To use the "is" operator he does not need to switch to VB.NET –  BeowulfOF Nov 26 '09 at 9:51
    
@BeowulfOF: I know, but if he's just trying to do filtering based on types - i.e. some sort of conditional catching etc., it may be useful to use an is in an exception filter rather than a catch block - it may be an avenue of approach which works. My initial suggestion (and it's still in the answer) is an is in the catch block. Bottom line here is that given that using an is is normally a bad smell, we might as well have a laundry list of possible solutions and let Tomas pick what suits him best in his specific context. But yes, it's unlikely. –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 26 '09 at 10:11
    
@AnonymousDownvoter: Any good reason why? @BeowulfOF: Didnt mean to imply that is is only in VB, just that exception filters are not exposed in C# –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 27 '11 at 0:21

When dealing with situations where I don't exactly know what type of exception might come out of a method, a little "trick" I like to do is to recover the Exception's class name and add it to the error log so there is more information.

try
{
   <code>

} catch ( Exception caughtEx )
{
   throw new Exception("Unknown Exception Thrown: "
                       + "\n  Type:    " + caughtEx.GetType().Name
                       + "\n  Message: " + caughtEx.Message);
}

I do vouch for always handling Exceptions types individually, but the extra bit of info can be helpful, specially when dealing with code from people who love to capture catch-all generic types.

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I'm confused here (esp by the upvotes). You're replacing a useful exception with a stacktrace with another which only has the highlights? Even if you made the exception refer to caughtEx as a child, I'd wonder what the point is (if you show the full exception.ToString() it'll show you the type anyway). I could understand if you were logging it at this point prior to doing a throw;... –  Ruben Bartelink Oct 30 '14 at 8:27
    
In my case I needed this for logging purposes, so caughtEx.GetType().Name was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  mayabelle Mar 2 at 19:49
try
{
    // Some code
}
catch (Web2PDFException ex)
{
    // It's your special exception
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // Any other exception here
}
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You should always catch exceptions as concrete as possible, so you should use

try
{
    //code
}
catch (Web2PDFException ex)
{
    //Handle the exception here
}

You chould of course use something like this if you insist:

try
{
}
catch (Exception err)
{
    if (err is Web2PDFException)
    {
        //Code
    }
}
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try
{
}
catch (Exception err)
{
    if (err is Web2PDFException)
        DoWhatever();
}

but there is probably a better way of doing whatever it is you want.

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Why was this downvoted? It is equivalent to several other examples. –  jp2code May 3 '12 at 14:57

you can add some extra information to your exception in your class and then when you catch the exception you can control your custom information to identify your exception

this.Data["mykey"]="keyvalue"; //you can add any type of data if you want

and then you can get your value

string mystr = (string) err.Data["mykey"];

like that for more information: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.exception.data.aspx

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Not sure why this was downvoted either. This offers a nice way of providing additional data to your code. –  jp2code May 3 '12 at 14:57
    
@jp2code I'm guessing because it doesn't answer the OP? –  Ruben Bartelink Oct 30 '14 at 8:28

Alternatively:

var exception = err as Web2PDFException; 

if ( excecption != null ) 
{ 
     Web2PDFException wex = exception; 
     .... 
}

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