Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Not sure, why it isn't working. I've referenced a bunch of stack overflow answers, but nothing seems to make a difference. I'm just trying to sort all the divs with class="searchMe" by a data-sortStart attribute. The data-sortStart part works fine, so I didn't include that function in this example, but it's basically a for loop that gives each successive div in the loop a data-sortStart of += 1.

here's my code:

$("#search_button").on("click", function() {
  appendicize($('.searchMe').sort(reSort));
});

function appendicize(el){
  var container = $('#whatWhat');
      container.html('');
  el.each(function(){
    $(this).appendTo(container);
  });
}

$('.searchMe').reSort(function (a, b) {
  var contentA = $(a).attr('data-sortStart'),
      contentB = $(b).attr('data-sortStart');
  return (contentA < contentB) ? -1 : (contentA > contentB) ? 1 : 0;
})
share|improve this question
3  
I don't see where you have a function named reSort for $('.searchMe').sort(reSort), or where you've defined a jQuery plugin called reSort for $('.searchMe').reSort(function (a, b) {. –  Crazy Train Aug 2 '13 at 21:00
1  
...did you mean function reSort(a, b) {... instead of $('.searchMe').reSort(function (a, b) {? –  Crazy Train Aug 2 '13 at 21:02
1  
FYI, you can do return contentA.localeCompare(contentB). –  Crazy Train Aug 2 '13 at 21:06
1  
If you intend to do a numeric comparison, then you need to convert the numeric strings to numbers. So var contentA = +$(a).attr('data-sortStart')... and so on. Which means no more .localeCompare(). –  Crazy Train Aug 2 '13 at 21:09
1  
Yeah, it's not necessary when comparing numeric strings of equal decimal places. But if they're not equal, then for example the string "10" is considered lower than the string "2" –  Crazy Train Aug 2 '13 at 21:12

1 Answer 1

The solution as pointed out by Crazy Train is as follows:

$(#search_button).click(function() {
  appendicize($('.searchMe').sort(reSort));
});

function appendicize(el){
  var container = $('#whatWhat');
      container.html('');
  el.each(function(){
    $(this).appendTo(container);
  });
}

function reSort(a, b) {
  var contentA = +$(a).attr('data-sortStart'),
      contentB = +$(b).attr('data-sortStart');
  return (contentA < contentB) ? -1 : (contentA > contentB) ? 1 : 0;
}

Adding a '+' before the variable initializers in the reSort function will properly compare the data-sortStart attributes as integers instead of strings (with strings a 10 is less than a 2) which explains why I was getting elements #10 and #11 sorted above the #2 element. Also initially the reSort function was not being called because I had it written like this:

$('.searchMe').reSort(function (a, b) {

instead of like this:

function reSort(a, b) {

The first way was unnecessary as I was already passing in $('.searchMe') up above when I call the functions:

appendicize($('.searchMe').sort(reSort));

thanks again crazy train :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.