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I have a UITableView with 5 UITableViewCells. Each cell contains a UIButton which is set up as follows:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
     NSString *identifier = @"identifier";
     UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:identifier];
     if (cell == nil) {
         cell = [[UITableView alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:identifier];
         [cell autorelelase];

         UIButton *button = [[UIButton alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(10, 5, 40, 20)];
         [button addTarget:self action:@selector(buttonPressedAction:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
         [button setTag:1];
         [cell.contentView addSubview:button];

         [button release];
     }

     UIButton *button = (UIButton *)[cell viewWithTag:1];
     [button setTitle:@"Edit" forState:UIControlStateNormal];

     return cell;
}

My question is this: in the buttonPressedAction: method, how do I know which button has been pressed. I've considered using tags but I'm not sure this is the best route. I'd like to be able to somehow tag the indexPath onto the control.

- (void)buttonPressedAction:(id)sender
{
    UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender;
    // how do I know which button sent this message?
    // processing button press for this row requires an indexPath. 
}

What's the standard way of doing this?

Edit:

I've kinda solved it by doing the following. I would still like to have an opinion whether this is the standard way of doing it or is there a better way?

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
     NSString *identifier = @"identifier";
     UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:identifier];
     if (cell == nil) {
         cell = [[UITableView alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:identifier];
         [cell autorelelase];

         UIButton *button = [[UIButton alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(10, 5, 40, 20)];
         [button addTarget:self action:@selector(buttonPressedAction:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
         [cell.contentView addSubview:button];

         [button release];
     }

     UIButton *button = (UIButton *)[cell.contentView.subviews objectAtIndex:0];
     [button setTag:indexPath.row];
     [button setTitle:@"Edit" forState:UIControlStateNormal];

     return cell;
}

- (void)buttonPressedAction:(id)sender
{
    UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender;
    int row = button.tag;
}

What's important to note is that I can't set the tag in the creation of the cell since the cell might be dequeued instead. It feels very dirty. There must be a better way.

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18 Answers 18

up vote 228 down vote accepted

In Apple's Accessory sample the following method is used:

[button addTarget:self action:@selector(checkButtonTapped:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];

Then in touch handler touch coordinate retrieved and index path is calculated from that coordinate:

- (void)checkButtonTapped:(id)sender
{
    CGPoint buttonPosition = [sender convertPoint:CGPointZero toView:self.tableView];
    NSIndexPath *indexPath = [self.tableView indexPathForRowAtPoint:buttonPosition];
    if (indexPath != nil)
    {
     ...
    }
}
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Yeah this is what I settled on (see my edit). I agree with you that it's not optimal. –  rein Nov 26 '09 at 10:35
2  
But you add UIButton to UITableViewCell yourself so you must just be consistent with what you do when creating cell. Although this approach does not really look elegant I have to admit –  Vladimir May 14 '10 at 4:30
2  
This will reliably pick out the cell that owns the button: UIView *view = button; while (![view isKindOfClass:[UITableViewCell class]]){ view = [view superview]} –  Jacob Lyles Aug 11 '10 at 20:42
2  
Edit2 works wonders! –  mga Apr 20 '12 at 4:20
2  
@Neil, code works fine for me on iOS 7 –  Vladimir Sep 20 '13 at 14:24
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A better way would be to subclass your button and add a indexPath property to it.

//Implement a subclass for UIButton.

@interface NewButton:UIButton
@property(nonatomic, strong) NSIndexPath *indexPath;


Make your button of type NewButton in the XIB or in the code whereever you are initializing them.

Then in the cellForRowAtIndexPath put the following line of code.

button.indexPath = indexPath;

return cell; //As usual



Now in your IBAction

-(IBAction)buttonClicked:(id)sender{
   NewButton *button = (NewButton *)sender;

//Now access the indexPath by buttons property..

   NSIndexPath *indexPath = button.indexPath; //:)
}
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This is slightly buggy because a cell's indexPath can change, if you call deleteRowsAtIndexPaths. –  John Gibb Jun 18 at 20:14
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Subclass the button to store the required value, maybe create a protocol (ControlWithData or something). Set the value when you add the button to the table view cell. In your touch up event, see if the sender obeys the protocol and extract the data. I normally store a reference to the actual object that is rendered on the table view cell.

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It's simple; make a custom cell and take a outlet of button

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    {
         NSString *identifier = @"identifier";
        customCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:identifier];

    cell.yourButton.tag = indexPath.Row;

- (void)buttonPressedAction:(id)sender

change id in above method to (UIButton *)

You can get the value that which button is being tapped by doing sender.tag.

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I always use tags.

You need to subclass the UITableviewCell and handle the button press from there.

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I don't quite understand how. The tag property is set up during the cell creation - this cell is reusable for each row with the same identifier. This tag is specific to the control in a generic reusable cell. How can I use this tag to differentiate buttons in cells which were created in a generic way? Could you post some code? –  rein Nov 26 '09 at 10:18
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Though I like the tag way... if you don't want to use tags for whatever reason, you could create a member NSArray of premade buttons:

NSArray* buttons ;

then create those buttons before rendering the tableView and push them into the array.

Then inside of the tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath: function you can do:

UIButton* button = [buttons objectAtIndex:[indexPath row] ] ;
[cell.contentView addSubview:button];

Then in the buttonPressedAction: function, you can do

- (void)buttonPressedAction:(id)sender {
   UIButton* button = (UIButton*)sender ;
   int row = [buttons indexOfObject:button] ;
   // Do magic
}
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How about sending the information like NSIndexPath in the UIButton using runtime injection.

1) You need runtime on the import

2) add static constant

3) add NSIndexPath to your button on runtime using:

(void)setMetaData:(id)target withObject:(id)newObj

4) on button press get metadata using:

(id)metaData:(id)target

Enjoy

    #import <objc/runtime.h>
    static char const * const kMetaDic = "kMetaDic";


    #pragma mark - Getters / Setters

- (id)metaData:(id)target {
    return objc_getAssociatedObject(target, kMetaDic);
}

- (void)setMetaData:(id)target withObject:(id)newObj {
    objc_setAssociatedObject(target, kMetaDic, newObj, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC);
}



    #On the cell constructor
    - (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    {
    ....
    cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
    ....
    [btnSocial addTarget:self
                                   action:@selector(openComments:)
                         forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];

    #add the indexpath here or another object
    [self setMetaData:btnSocial withObject:indexPath];

    ....
    }



    #The action after button been press:

    - (IBAction)openComments:(UIButton*)sender{

        NSIndexPath *indexPath = [self metaData:sender];
        NSLog(@"indexPath: %d", indexPath.row);

        //Reuse your indexpath Now
    }
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IF the table is rearranged or a row deleted then this won't work. –  Neil Sep 20 '13 at 13:12
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Here's how I do it. Simple and concise:

- (void)buttonTappedAction:(id)sender
{
    CGPoint buttonPosition = [sender convertPoint:CGPointZero
                                           toView:self.tableView];
    NSIndexPath *indexPath = [self.tableView indexPathForRowAtPoint:buttonPosition];
    ...
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This is the easiest solution so far. –  Ninja Dec 14 '12 at 3:40
    
This should have more upvotes –  jbat100 Mar 7 '13 at 21:58
    
Even more simpler: use CGPointZero instead of CGPointMake(0, 0) ;-) –  Jakob W Apr 10 '13 at 8:41
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TO HANDLE SECTIONS - I stored the NSIndexPath in a custom UITableViewCell

IN CLKIndexPricesHEADERTableViewCell.xib

IN IB Add UIButton to XIB - DONT add action!

Add outlet @property (retain, nonatomic) IBOutlet UIButton *buttonIndexSectionClose;

DO NOT CTRL+DRAG an action in IB(done in code below)

@interface CLKIndexPricesHEADERTableViewCell : UITableViewCell
...
@property (retain, nonatomic) IBOutlet UIButton *buttonIndexSectionClose;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSIndexPath * indexPathForCell;
@end

In viewForHeaderInSection (should also work for cellForRow.... etc if you table has only 1 section)

- viewForHeaderInSection is called for each section 1...2...3
- get the cell CLKIndexPricesHEADERTableViewCell 
- getTableRowHEADER just does the normal dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier
- STORE the indexPath IN the UITableView cell
- indexPath.section = (NSInteger)section
- indexPath.row = 0 always (we are only interested in sections)

- (UIView *) tableView:(UITableView *)tableView1 viewForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section {


    //Standard method for getting a UITableViewCell
    CLKIndexPricesHEADERTableViewCell * cellHEADER = [self getTableRowHEADER];

...use the section to get data for your cell

...fill it in

   indexName        = ffaIndex.routeCode;
   indexPrice       = ffaIndex.indexValue;

   //

   [cellHEADER.buttonIndexSectionClose addTarget:self
                                          action:@selector(buttonDELETEINDEXPressedAction:forEvent:)
                                forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];


   cellHEADER.indexPathForCell = [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:0 inSection:section];


    return cellHEADER;
}

USER presses DELETE Button on a Section header and this calls

- (void)buttonDELETEINDEXPressedAction:(id)sender forEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{
    NSLog(@"%s", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);


    UIView *  parent1 = [sender superview];   // UiTableViewCellContentView
    //UIView *myContentView = (UIView *)parent1;

    UIView *  parent2 = [parent1 superview];  // custom cell containing the content view
    //UIView *  parent3 = [parent2 superview];  // UITableView containing the cell
    //UIView *  parent4 = [parent3 superview];  // UIView containing the table


    if([parent2 isMemberOfClass:[CLKIndexPricesHEADERTableViewCell class]]){
        CLKIndexPricesHEADERTableViewCell *myTableCell = (CLKIndexPricesHEADERTableViewCell *)parent2;

        //UITableView *myTable = (UITableView *)parent3;
        //UIView *mainView = (UIView *)parent4;

        NSLog(@"%s indexPath.section,row[%d,%d]", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, myTableCell.indexPathForCell.section,myTableCell.indexPathForCell.row);

        NSString *key = [self.sortedKeysArray objectAtIndex:myTableCell.indexPathForCell.section];
        if(key){
            NSLog(@"%s DELETE object at key:%@", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__,key);
            self.keyForSectionIndexToDelete = key;
            self.sectionIndexToDelete = myTableCell.indexPathForCell.section;

            UIAlertView *alertView = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Remove Index"
                                                                message:@"Are you sure"
                                                               delegate:self
                                                      cancelButtonTitle:@"No"
                                                      otherButtonTitles:@"Yes", nil];
            alertView.tag = kALERTVIEW_REMOVE_ONE_INDEX;
            [alertView show];
            [alertView release];
            //------
        }else{
            NSLog(@"ERROR: [%s] key is nil for section:%d", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__,myTableCell.indexPathForCell.section);
        }

    }else{
        NSLog(@"ERROR: [%s] CLKIndexPricesHEADERTableViewCell not found", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
    }
}

In this example I added a Delete button so should show UIAlertView to confirm it

I store the section and key into the dictionary storing info about the section in a ivar in the VC

- (void)alertView:(UIAlertView *)alertView clickedButtonAtIndex:(NSInteger)buttonIndex {
   if(alertView.tag == kALERTVIEW_REMOVE_ONE_INDEX){
        if(buttonIndex==0){
            //NO
            NSLog(@"[%s] BUTTON:%d", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__,buttonIndex);
            //do nothing
        }
        else if(buttonIndex==1){
            //YES
            NSLog(@"[%s] BUTTON:%d", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__,buttonIndex);
            if(self.keyForSectionIndexToDelete != nil){

                //Remove the section by key
                [self.indexPricesDictionary removeObjectForKey:self.keyForSectionIndexToDelete];

                //sort the keys so sections appear alphabetically/numbericsearch (minus the one we just removed)
                [self updateTheSortedKeysArray];                

                //Delete the section from the table using animation
                [self.tableView beginUpdates];

                [self.tableView deleteSections:[NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndex:self.sectionIndexToDelete]
                              withRowAnimation:UITableViewRowAnimationAutomatic];
                [self.tableView endUpdates];

                //required to trigger refresh of myTableCell.indexPathForCell else old values in UITableViewCells
                [self.tableView reloadData];
            }else{
                NSLog(@"ERROR: [%s] OBJECT is nil", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__);
            }
        }
        else {
            NSLog(@"ERROR: [%s] UNHANDLED BUTTON:%d", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__,buttonIndex);
        }
    }else {
        NSLog(@"ERROR: [%s] unhandled ALERTVIEW TAG:%d", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__,alertView.tag);
    }
}
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A slight variation on Cocoanuts answer (that helped me solve this) when the button was in the footer of a table (which prevents you from finding the 'clicked cell':

-(IBAction) buttonAction:(id)sender;
{
    id parent1 = [sender superview];   // UiTableViewCellContentView
    id parent2 = [parent1 superview];  // custom cell containing the content view
    id parent3 = [parent2 superview];  // UITableView containing the cell
    id parent4 = [parent3 superview];  // UIView containing the table

    UIView *myContentView = (UIView *)parent1;
    UITableViewCell *myTableCell = (UITableViewCell *)parent2;
    UITableView *myTable = (UITableView *)parent3;
    UIView *mainView = (UIView *)parent4;

    CGRect footerViewRect = myTableCell.frame;
    CGRect rect3 = [myTable convertRect:footerViewRect toView:mainView];    

    [cc doSomethingOnScreenAtY:rect3.origin.y];
}
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It works for me aswell, Thanks @Cocoanut

I found the method of using the superview's superview to obtain a reference to the cell's indexPath worked perfectly. Thanks to iphonedevbook.com (macnsmith) for the tip link text

-(void)buttonPressed:(id)sender {
 UITableViewCell *clickedCell = (UITableViewCell *)[[sender superview] superview];
 NSIndexPath *clickedButtonPath = [self.tableView indexPathForCell:clickedCell];
...

}
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create an nsmutable array and put all button in that array usint[array addObject:yourButton];

in the button press method

-

 (void)buttonPressedAction:(id)sender
{
    UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender;

for(int i=0;i<[yourArray count];i++){

if([buton isEqual:[yourArray objectAtIndex:i]]){

//here write wat u need to do

}
}
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// how do I know which button sent this message?
// processing button press for this row requires an indexPath.

Pretty straightforward actually:

- (void)buttonPressedAction:(id)sender
{
    UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender;
    CGPoint rowButtonCenterInTableView = [[rowButton superview] convertPoint:rowButton.center toView:self.tableView];
    NSIndexPath *indexPath = [self.tableView indexPathForRowAtPoint:rowButtonCenterInTableView];
    MyTableViewItem *rowItem = [self.itemsArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
    // Now you're good to go.. do what the intention of the button is, but with
    // the context of the "row item" that the button belongs to
    [self performFooWithItem:rowItem];
}

Working well for me :P

if you want to adjust your target-action setup, you can include the event parameter in the method, and then use the touches of that event to resolve the coordinates of the touch. The coordinates still need to be resolved in the touch view bounds, but that may seem easier for some people.

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Am I missing something? Can't you just use sender to identify the button. Sender will give you info like this:

<UIButton: 0x4b95c10; frame = (246 26; 30 30); opaque = NO; tag = 104; layer = <CALayer: 0x4b95be0>>

Then if you want to change the properties of the button, say the background image you just tell sender:

[sender setBackgroundImage:[UIImage imageNamed:@"new-image.png"] forState:UIControlStateNormal];

If you need the tag then ACBurk's method is fine.

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1  
They're looking for their "object" that the button relates to –  ohhorob May 14 '10 at 0:33
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I found the method of using the superview's superview to obtain a reference to the cell's indexPath worked perfectly. Thanks to iphonedevbook.com (macnsmith) for the tip link text

-(void)buttonPressed:(id)sender {
 UITableViewCell *clickedCell = (UITableViewCell *)[[sender superview] superview];
 NSIndexPath *clickedButtonPath = [self.tableView indexPathForCell:clickedCell];
...

}
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2  
You great man. I tried your code. It worked perfect for me. Thank You. –  srikanth rongali Apr 30 '10 at 10:39
    
Cocoanut, your code fragment pointed me in the right direction for my own variation on this problem. Thanks! In case anyone else needs it, my special case was that the button was in a custom cell that was being displayed as part of the footer. I'll add code below –  software evolved May 9 '11 at 16:48
6  
This is so very, very wrong and is broken in newer versions of the OS. Don't walk superview trees you don't own. –  Kenrik March Jul 18 '13 at 23:12
2  
This was working for me under iOS 6, but is broken in iOS 7. It appears that @KenrikMarch has a valid point! –  Jon Schneider Oct 5 '13 at 2:05
1  
in iOS 7 it's 1 more step up the superview. e.g. [[[sender superview] superview] superView]; –  CW0007007 Jan 21 at 12:19
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Found a nice solution to this problem elsewhere, no messing around with tags on the button:

- (void)buttonPressedAction:(id)sender {

NSSet *touches = [event allTouches];
UITouch *touch = [touches anyObject];
CGPoint currentTouchPosition = [touch locationInView:self.tableView];
NSIndexPath *indexPath = [self.tableView indexPathForRowAtPoint: currentTouchPosition];

do stuff with the indexPath...
}
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Very cool solution - I like it. –  rein Dec 11 '09 at 17:23
2  
It's not clear in this example where you get the 'event' object from. –  Nick Ludlam Jan 27 '10 at 13:43
    
This is the solution I went with. Using tags is unpredictable when adding/removing rows since their indexes change. Also, –  raidfive May 21 '10 at 2:54
    
@NickLudlam: probably the method name is not buttonPressedAction: but buttonPressedAction:forEvent:. –  KPM Oct 23 '12 at 4:43
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you can use the tag pattern:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
     NSString *identifier = @"identifier";
     UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:identifier];
     if (cell == nil) {
         cell = [[UITableView alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:identifier];
         [cell autorelelase];

         UIButton *button = [[UIButton alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(10, 5, 40, 20)];
         [button addTarget:self action:@selector(buttonPressedAction:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
         [button setTag:[indexPath row]]; //use the row as the current tag
         [cell.contentView addSubview:button];

         [button release];
     }

     UIButton *button = (UIButton *)[cell viewWithTag:[indexPath row]]; //use [indexPath row]
     [button setTitle:@"Edit" forState:UIControlStateNormal];

     return cell;
}

- (void)buttonPressedAction:(id)sender
{
    UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender;
    //button.tag has the row number (you can convert it to indexPath)
}
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How would I tag the controls if I had multiple controls on a single cell? –  rein Nov 26 '09 at 10:20
    
I'm not sure this would work - if the cell gets created for row #1 then it will get the tag 1. If it gets dequeued for row #3 then it will still have a tag of 1, not 3. –  rein Nov 26 '09 at 10:21
    
guess you are right about the second comment. my bad. I think your best solution is to subclass UIButton, add another property or two of your own, and then set/get them in the appropriate cases (stick with the tag:1 you had in your code) –  Nir Levy Nov 27 '09 at 8:51
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I would use the tag property like you said, setting the tag like so:

[button setTag:indexPath.row];

then getting the tag inside of the buttonPressedAction like so:

((UIButton *)sender).tag

Or

UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender; 
button.tag;
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1  
This approach is completely broken for tables with sections. –  ohhorob May 14 '10 at 0:36
    
no, you could just use some simple function to put the section in the tag as well. –  ACBurk May 14 '10 at 6:04
    
tag is an integer. seems a bit clumsy to be encoding/decoding index paths into view tags. –  ohhorob May 14 '10 at 16:08
    
That's correct, but it is a solution, though not one that I'd use if I had sections. All I was trying to say was that it could be done using this method, that it wasn't broken. A better, more complex version would determine the indexpath from the position of the button inside of the UITableView. However, since rein has said he only has five cells (without sections), it probably makes that method over complicated and your initial comment and this whole comment thread pointless. –  ACBurk May 19 '10 at 19:15
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