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When writing Python tests with the mock library, I often get "what arguments a method is called with" like this,

from __future__ import print_function
import mock

m = mock.MagicMock(side_effect=lambda x: x * x)
m(4)
print("m called with: ", m.call_args_list)

(this will print m called with: [call(4)]). Question: Is there any way to get the return value (in this case, 16)?

Details: In my particular scenario, I want to use side_effect to return a sub-mock object: introspecting that object to see what is called on it is important. For example, the "real code" (non-test code) might write,

myobj = m(4)
myobj.foo()

Using side_effect seems like a convenient way to return new sub-mock objects, but also keep around call_args_list. However, it doesn't seem like MagicMock stores return values from the side_effect function ... am I wrong?

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3 Answers 3

Use return_value.

For example,

import unittest

import mock

def foo(m):
    myobj = m(4)
    myobj.foo()

import unittest

class TestFoo(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_foo(self):
        m2 = mock.MagicMock()
        m = mock.MagicMock(return_value=m2)

        foo(m)

        m.assert_called_once_with(4)
        m2.foo.assert_called_once_with()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
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This requires modification to the non-testing code, which is calling m(4). –  gatoatigrado Aug 4 '13 at 1:42
    
@gatoatigrado, I updated the answer. –  falsetru Aug 4 '13 at 3:18
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You don't need a side_effect, that is what mocks do already without it, they return other mocks.

You make assertions on them by doing mymock.return_value.assert_called_once_with(4)

If you did though, you'd just return a mock you had a reference to elsewhere from side_effect.

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I want the "other mock returned" to be something special. m(4) is not just another MagicMock but an object with some state (in my case, mocking out a Redis server). Thanks though! –  gatoatigrado Aug 3 '13 at 0:44
    
Then configure it with m.return_value. –  Julian Aug 4 '13 at 1:28
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This is not what mocks are intended for if you'd ask me. If you want to assert a return value you should call the function directly. If you need to jump though hoops to register what a function returns, your design is most likely flawed.

If for example you have an internal function, you should not test the inner function. If you want to test the inner function, make it publicly accessible.

So instead of this:

def spam(input):
    def eggs(nested):
        return nested*2
    input = eggs(nested)
    return eggs(input)

Do this:

def eggs(nested):
    return nested*2

def spam(input):
    input = eggs(nested)
    return eggs(input)
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