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What follows is a long explanation, but it's the only way to effectively communicate the issue I'm trying to resolve...

I am (somewhat desperately, and entirely unsuccessfully) trying to overlay divs without the use of absolute positioning. The need stems from a paypal cart that I place on the site via a Javascript. The cart's natural position is hard against the top margin of the webpage (not its containing div, which is #wpPayPal, or the wrapper for this div, #main).

The script's author strongly recommends against customizing the cart's stylesheet, but I found a tutorial he wrote that enables insertion of the cart into a placeholder div, with positioning instructions for the container that works - I was able to position the cart below the site's top banner section. However...

The cart's HTML form and a ul element within each have height requirements in the cart's stylesheet, and this pushes the page's main content, wrapped by the container div #imageWrapper, too far down the page to be acceptable.

I tried to position #imageWrapper over #main with several ideas gathered from posts on this site with no success. I've tried absolute positioning on #imageWrapper, but this frees the footer to float beneath. #imageWrapper's height is variable, hence I do not want to hold the footer in place with height, since the min-height to prevent overlap would push the footer down too far for much of the site's content.

I also tried pulling position:relative from the cart form's CSS, but the cart immediately floats back to the top of the webpage. Margin, top-margin, etc.,do not remedy this.

I then read an article on using position:relative and z-index to overlay divs. Tried this, too, first by putting z-index: -1 on #main (the div that wraps the paypal cart), but the cart disappears. Not sure where it goes, either, since the site's breadcrumb nav, also wrapped by #main, stayed put.

I then set the z-index for main to 0 and applied position:relative to #imageWrapper with z-index:100. The cart reappeared but still holds #imageWrapper down.

Suggestions are greatly welcomed. I'm not an interface person by any stretch of the imagination, just a guy who knows how to use Google, so thanks in advance for clearly articulating your resolution :) Also, FYI, presently I have the min-height requirement for the cart form set to 0, and set the UL element within to height:auto. With only a single item in the cart, this allows #imageWrapper to move up the page enough to be acceptable, but this is not a viable long-term solution.

Here's an example page - to see the cart, add an item using the dropdown that appears below the main image. In its expanded state, you'll see how #imageWrapper sits against it.

I've included portions of the offending HTML / CSS below:

<div id="main">
    <div id="wpPayPal">
    </div><!--end wpPayPal-->
    <div id="breadcrumbs">
        <span class="B_crumbBox"><span class="B_firstCrumb"><a class="B_homeCrumb" href="/">home</a></span> &raquo;</span></span>
    </div> <!--end breadcrumbs -->
</div><!-- end Main -->

<div id="imageWrapper">
    <div id="imageInnerWrapper">
        <div id="featureImage">
            <div class="filename"><h1>~&nbsp;Bryce Canyon Sunrise | Bryce Canyon | Utah&nbsp;~</h1>
            </div><!--end filename-->

etc...

#main {
    display: inline;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 0;
}

#imageWrapper {
    clear: both;
    width: 840px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    padding: 0;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 100;
}

#imageInnerWrapper {
    width: 840px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    padding: 0;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 100;
}

#featureImage {
    width: 840px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    padding: 0;  
}

#wpPayPal {
    overflow: hidden;
    float: right;
    margin-right: 100px;
    min-width: 365px;
    min-height: 20px;
}

/* Override the default Mini Cart styles */

#wpBody #PPMiniCart form {
    position: relative;
    right: auto;
    width: auto;
    min-height: 0;
}

#wpBody #PPMiniCart form ul {
    height: auto;
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Simple fiddle: Just CSS

Some guy posted another but it had a bunch of extra unnecessary code and some JS Another post had the answer but was missing something

HTML:

<div class="this">To BE UNDER</div>
<div class="over"><span>..or not To BE UNDER</span></div>

CSS:

.over {
    background: rgba(230, 6, 6, .5);
    float: right;
    height: 460px;
    margin-top: -500px;
    margin-right:159px;
    overflow: visible;
    position: relative;
    width: 560px;
    color:#FFFFFF;    /* Just for looks*/
    z-index: 1000;
    padding:20px    /* Just for looks*/
}
.over span {
    position: relative;    /* Just for looks*/
    top: 15px;    /* Just for looks*/
}
.this {
    width:560px;
    height:460px;
    color:#FFFFFF;    /* Just for looks*/
    padding:20px;    /* Just for looks*/
    background-image: url("http://www.tshirtvortex.net/wp-content/uploads/dramaticchipmunk.jpg");    /* Just for looks*/
}

http://jsfiddle.net/3WDf7/

share|improve this answer

Got it!!! :D

Pure Css solution Very Easy. Put the following.

#main {
float: right;
overflow: visible;
position: relative;
z-index: 1000;
height: 177px;
width: 100%;
}

Replace whatever you have in css #main with what i have done above.

So remove the following:

display: inline;
position: relative;
z-index: 0;

Explanation: Main idea here is to float the main element, make it of certain height so at no point it pushes everything down. But make overflow of it visible. Overflow of content doesn't affect siblings of main element.

share|improve this answer
    
lot of bad css code everywhere though...:) by bad i mean it has no effect. –  Muhammad Umer Aug 4 '13 at 2:32
    
Your solution works as expected and avoids JavaScript. Don't know why but when I first tried it, overflow: visible made PPMiniCart floats up on hide (that is why I introduced the custom events). Anyway, OP should accept your answer. –  Anthony Accioly Aug 4 '13 at 5:06
1  
Well, thanks..i think you applied overflow:visible; to #wpPayPal. which i think is made to expand only and hide what's flows out. So when there is nothing in cart script pushes paypal box up using relative. Which puts it outside. When there is something in cart that actually extends PPminicart that make it aslo extend #wpPayPal and not overflows... –  Muhammad Umer Aug 4 '13 at 5:39
#wpPayPal {
margin-top: -40px;//or a value that fits your taste
margin-right: 27px;//or a value that fits your taste too
}
share|improve this answer

None of the previous answers actually help with your requirement, which is to allow PPMiniCart to expand and contract without pushing imageWrapper down.

The trick here is to give wpPayPal a fixed height large enough to hold the contracted version of PPMiniCart (40px will do - this will give the shopping cart enough room, without pushing imageWrapper too far down).

#wpPayPal {
    height:40px;
}

Then give main (the container that holds wpPayPal) a z-index greater than that of imageWrapper so that it overflows over it.

#main {
    z-index: 1;
}
#imageWrapper {
    z-index: 0;
}

Setting imageWrapper z-index to 100 kind of overdoes it, I would recommend 0 like I did above.

You also need some JavasScript to set overflow: visible on wpPayPal after PPMiniCart expands and remove it before it contracts. Fortunately Mini Cart JS exposes a nice event-driven API that allows custom callbacks. Since you are using jQuery in your webpage let's take advantage of that:

PAYPAL.apps.MiniCart.render({
    parent: 'wpPayPal',
    events: {
        afterShow: function () {
            $("#wpPayPal").css("overflow", "visible");
        },
        onHide: function () {
            $("#wpPayPal").css("overflow", "");
        }
    }
});

Please note the careful choice of afterShow and onHide callbacks, if you try to do it any different (setting overflow: visible before PPMiniCart expands or removing it before PPMiniCart contracts) PPMiniCart will "float up" during the transition.


Finally, a working fiddle is worth a thousand words.

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