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I'm new to C, and for my class, we have a project where we have to write a function that reads all the items in the file and returns them in file-order, in a dynamically created list. Each line of the file is one item and has the format:

'<description>' <damage> <cost> <weight>

It's supposed to return a base pointer to items in file in file order, or NULL if file doesn't exist.

Here's my code so far:

item_t *ReadItemsFromFile(char *file)
{
typedef struct item item_t;
struct item
{
   char name[32];
   float cost, weight;
   int dam;
};FILE *fpin = fopen(file, "r");

if(fpin != NULL)
{
  item_t i[20];
  int n = 0;
  char line[sizeof(file)];
  while(fgets(line, sizeof(line), fpin) != NULL){
      (fscanf(fpin, " '%[^']' %d %f %f", i[n].name, &i[n].dam, &i[n].cost, &i[n].weight));
  fputs(i[n].name, stdout);
  n++;
}
} else {
  return NULL;
} 
  return(0);
}

I've been using fputs to try to test the code, but it keeps giving me gibberish for the first and last items. Also, when I try putting

fputs(&i[n].dam, stdout);

so I can test the other variables for the struct, I keep getting an error saying "passing argument 1 of 'fputs' from incompatible pointer type.

I'm not sure if I'm accurately passing into struct variables using fscanf, or if it's something else.

share|improve this question
    
Please read a tag's info on this site before using it. RPG is a computer language. (Rant alert: RPG is also not terribly descriptive of a computer game. How large a percentage of games could you say "I'm playing the role of a..."? Even going back to old video games: I'm playing the role of a frog crossing the highway. I'm playing the role of an spaceship pilot shooting at asteroids. Etc, etc) –  WarrenT Aug 3 '13 at 4:12
    
Don't forget to close files you successfully opened. Should your 'list' contain pointers to the next item in the list, or is an array acceptable? –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 3 '13 at 5:17

4 Answers 4

You need to move the struct definition to be outside of your function.

Your specification for how long the line should be is wrong. You need to specify a number of bytes that is long enough to take in an entire line.

When you use fgets() to get a line, you should not use fscanf() to read from the file. You are already using fgets() to read from the file. You use sscanf() to read data from the string that is contained within line.

The above is enough to get your program to do something nominally useful.

To return a list of items, you will need to actually call malloc() (or some other similar function) to create the memory for your "dynamically created list" that you have specified as a requirement. Since you don't know how many items you have up front, you either need a way to discover how many there are, or use a mechanism that allows your list to grow dynamically.

share|improve this answer
    
It worked! I ended up just using fscanf() instead of using fgets(). How would I malloc the structure? Would it be best to malloc it while I'm in the while/if loop, or outside of the if loop? –  Aribelle Alise Aug 3 '13 at 23:32
    
You could malloc() one structure at a time or all at once. If you do it one at a time, you would need a way to collect them together so that you can return the collection back to the caller. If you do it all at once, you can just return the pointer to the beginning of the single large allocation (that is, you would be using malloc() to dynamically allocate an array). –  jxh Aug 3 '13 at 23:40
    
I tried to malloc() inside the while loop, all at once, but when I tried to return the pointer at the end, it says it's not declared. –  Aribelle Alise Aug 3 '13 at 23:46
    
When you declare a variable, it is scoped by the nearest enclosing braces. If you want to be able to use the value of a variable, the variable has to be within scope of where you are trying to use it. –  jxh Aug 3 '13 at 23:50

One problem is that you use fgets to read a line from the file into line, but you then ignore that line and use fscanf to read from the next line. You should use sscanf to parse the line you just read instead. Alternately, don't use fgets at all and just fscanf directly it the while condition:

while(4 == fscanf(fpin, " '%[^']'%d%f%f", i[n].name, &i[n].dam, &i[n].cost, &i[n].weight)) {
    fputs(i[n].name, stdout);
    n++; }

Another problem is that you declare line just large enough to hold sizeof(char *) characters -- probably just 4 or 8, which won't be big enough for an entire line, so you'll only be able to read part of the line. You need to declare it big enough to hold the longest line in the file.

A third problem is that you declare struct item and item_t as local to the function, which means that your code won't even compile as you try to use item_t outside the function as part of its return type. You need to move the delcarations to the global scope before the function declaration.

A fourth problem is that you declare the item array that you're reading into (i) as a local variable, so you won't be able to return it from the function -- if you do, the pointer you return will point at garbage. But since you always return NULL, you won't see that problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Personally, I think it will be a lot easier to report an error meaningfully and resynchronize after any scan failure if the code uses fgets() and sscanf() rather than fscanf(). However, that's a minor detail and the rest of the advice is valuable. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 3 '13 at 5:25

Your issues with fputs() are a result of the function being specifically for printing char * strings. To print out the other things, you would want to use fprintf(), or better yet if you are printing to the standard output, simply use printf().

To eliminate the gibberish, make sure your file is saved in the proper encoding. When I saved my test inventory file as ANSI or UTF-8 without BOM (ANSI as UTF-8) everything worked fine, but whenever I saved as UTF-8, it inserted 3 bytes to the front of my file that the program could not handle, and spit out gibberish for my first item.

I also modified ReadItemsFromFile(), as you can see, to accept a pointer to an int which will be the int that the number of elements read will be stored in so I could test my code, you can remove this if it does not conform to the specifications in your class. Additionally, it was pretty crude, but I added in code to re-size the memory block that the array of items is stored in on-the-fly using malloc() and memcpy() (requires stdlib.h and string.h respectively) since realloc() was not working in the environment I had the executable run in, but if realloc() works for you, I suggest using it instead.

Also note that I put an arbitrary buffer length of 128 characters, including the \0 null terminator character for each line. This can be adjusted to whatever works for you.

And here is the code that I have been talking about:

struct item
{
    char name[32];
    float cost, weight;
    int dam;
};
typedef struct item item_t;

item_t *ReadItemsFromFile(char *file, int *count)
{
    FILE *fpin = fopen(file, "r");
    int n = 0;
    item_t *items = NULL;

    if(fpin != NULL)
    {
        char line[128];
        while(fgets(line, 128, fpin) != NULL){
            item_t *newptr = (item_t *)malloc((n + 1) * sizeof(item_t));
            memcpy(newptr, items, n * sizeof(item_t));
            free(items);
            items = newptr;

            if (4 == sscanf(line, "'%[^']' %d %f %f\n", items[n].name, &items[n].dam, &items[n].cost, &items[n].weight)) {
                n++;
            }
        }

        fclose(fpin)
    } else {
        *count = 0;
        return NULL;
    }

    *count = n;

    return items;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the About page soon. You should use realloc() instead of malloc() + memcpy() + free() to increase the size of the array. We can then debate the cost of increasing the size of the array one item at a time, but it does work. You should also test that sscanf() successfully converts 4 data items. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 3 '13 at 5:23
    
@JonathanLeffler I specifically mentioned that realloc() was not working on my application and was causing an application hang due to the environment it was in.Additionally, I was attempting to improve upon the OP's original code without completing the assignment myself. –  Pandacoder Aug 3 '13 at 20:45
    
OK - I missed that. What environment are you working in that realloc() doesn't work? –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 3 '13 at 21:42
    
I was running the code in a very "beat up" so to speak copy of Cygwin, and was compiling with GCC with the C99 standard. Normally I would have used MinGW or GCC under a Linux distro, but I also didn't think I would run into the issues I had. –  Pandacoder Aug 3 '13 at 21:53

Okay, I stopped using fgets() and moved the struct outside of the function, but I'm still having issues returning the pointer. I keep trying to return the pointer after mallocing it, but it informs me of "return from incompatible pointer type". Here's my code so far:

struct items_t
{
   char name[32];
   float cost, weight;
   int dam;
};
typedef struct items_t items_t;

item_t *ReadItemsFromFile(char *file)
{

  FILE *fpin = fopen(file, "r");

if(fpin)
{   
  items_t i[50];
  int n = 0;

   while(4 == (fscanf(fpin, " '%[^']' %d %f %f", i[n].name, &i[n].dam, &i[n].cost, &i[n].weight)))
{
  n++;
  items_t *a = (items_t*)malloc(sizeof(items_t));
  return(&a);

}
} else {
  return NULL; 
}
return(0);

}
share|improve this answer
    
The return type of your function is item_t *, and you are trying to return a pointer to item_t *, also written as item_t **. Change return(&a); to return(a);. Also, you are always malloc()ing the same size. I suggest taking a look at my answer above (however replace my malloc(), memcpy() and free() with a simple realloc()). Right now your code is attempting to allocate a memory block and return the pointer to it, but there is no actual data being stored in a. You need to return i instead. –  Pandacoder Aug 4 '13 at 3:55

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