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I understand how you can easily scroll to anchors by referencing them like so...

<a href = "#div1">Click here to go to div!</a>
<div id = "div1">Stuff in your div</div>

I am having problems with this because I have a music player at the top that has its position set to fixed, so it is cutting off the top of my divs when I try to the anchor.

If you want an example, check out my page here. Click a post's picture to start playing the song, then click the "View Post" thing that SHOULD take you to the correct post, but you can see that the top is cut off.

Is there an easy way to have some type of offset or something so I can remedy this. Also, can I make it so it doesn't change the URL of the site to have /#somethinghere at the end?

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1  
possible duplicate of offsetting an html anchor to adjust for fixed header Since you are clicking a <a> tag you are going to be modifying the url. This could be stopped by using jQuery to do the scrolling. –  abc123 Aug 3 '13 at 1:56

1 Answer 1

This is possible with javascript, offset variable must change according to the desired offset

Javascript:

function getpos(myElement)
        {
            var offset = 20;
            window.scrollTo(0, 0);
            var rect = myElement.getBoundingClientRect();
            window.scrollTo(rect.left , rect.top - offset);
        }

HTML:

<div id="yourElementId" onclick="getpos(this);">image or another element</div>

The window will scroll to the clicked element with the id 'yourElementId' and a offset of '20'

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wouldn't it be better to make the function getpos() take a string that is the id you are looking for? –  abc123 Aug 3 '13 at 2:15
    
yes I'm new here, should i change my answer? –  nejib Aug 3 '13 at 2:27
    
I'd add it under your current answer, as a recommendation. Your answer solves his problem but adding the above would make it so you only have the function defined one time so it is better practice. I upvoted this and am not going to take it away for making it more clear. –  abc123 Aug 3 '13 at 2:31

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