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I'm writing a library similar to AQuery but with a refined syntax for manipulating elements.

Essentially what AQuery does is safely access the view hierarchy and allow you to call subclass methods on objects like ImageView and TextView.

I've written a generic way to use a subclass of View by using the following code:

My Query object is the base object that's used to manipulate the view hierarchy. The basic format looks like this:

public class Query {
    private View mView;
    // ...
}

Next is the generic interface. This is an inner interface of the Query object:

private interface Operation<T extends View> {
    public void execute(T view);
}

Next is the run method in Query. This checks the current node this query represents and calls the execute method on the Operation object if it is successful:

private <T extends View> Query run(Class<T> cls, Operation<T> operation) {
    T t = cls.cast(mView);

    if (t == null) {
        Log.e(TAG, "view is not a " + cls.getSimpleName());
    } else {
        operation.execute(t);
    }

    return this;
}

So now that the template code is written, I use methods similar to this to implement functionality:

public Query text(final CharSequence str) {
    return run(TextView.class, new Operation<TextView>() {

        @Override
        public void execute(TextView view) {
            view.setText(str);
        }
    });
}

For every method that modifies the View hierarchy, I have to write this boilerplate-looking code.

Is there any way I can refactor this code to make methods like text simpler?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

FYI what you have here isn't really checking the type of mView. Class.cast will throw a ClassCastException if mView is not assignable to type T, so the log message there doesn't actually represent what happens. t == null would be true if and only if mView were null.

It's a little hard to tell what you're trying to achieve without some stubs of what Query will do. If your use would allow parameterization of Query, then you can just make the operation a function of that. This would give you compile-time checks of the view matching the type of the query. e.g.

public interface Query<ViewT extends View> {
    void run(ViewT view);
}

public Query<TextView> text(final CharSequence str) {
    return new Query<TextView>() {
        public void run(TextView view) {
            view.setText(str);
        }
    };
}

If that's not possible (i.e. the view types are never known at compile time) then you can still parameterize the implementation of it and simply perform the action if and only if the argument type matches the query type. e.g.:

public interface Query {
    void run(View view);
}

private abstract class TypedQuery<ViewT extends View> implements Query {
    private final Class<ViewT> viewType;

    private TypedQuery(Class<ViewT> viewType) {
        this.viewType = viewType;
    }

    public final void run(View view) {
        if (viewType.isInstance(view)) {
            runInternal((ViewT) view);
        } else {
            Log.e(TAG, "view " + view + " is not a " + viewType.getSimpleName());
        }
    }

    protected abstract void runInternal(ViewT view);
}

public Query text(final CharSequence str) {
    return new TypedQuery<TextView>(TextView.class) {
        @Override
        protected void runInternal(TextView view) {
            view.setText(str);
        }
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, it's allowed me to put my head in a different space. :D –  Brad Aug 3 '13 at 4:01

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