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Assume you have a numpy array as array([[5],[1,2],[5,6,7],[5],[5]]). Is there a function, such as np.where, that can be used to return all row indices where [5] is the row value? For example, in the array above, the returned values should be [0, 3, 4] indicating the [5] row numbers.

Please note that each row in the array can differ in length.

Thanks folks, you all deserve best answer, but i gave the green mark to the first one :)

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Are you sure you even want an array here? What are you doing that would best be solved by a 1-dimensional array of variable-length lists? –  user2357112 Aug 3 '13 at 5:49
    
In the real problem, those [5]'s are [?] indicating missing data, which I want them removed from the dataset. One way is to initialize another array that takes the row indices where [?] is not present. The reason why the structure is erratic is because some samples correspond to more than one class. Sorry about the Machine learning jargon, but thats the only way i can think of for explaining the importance of such arrays. –  Issam Laradji Aug 3 '13 at 6:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should do it:

[i[0] for i,v in np.ndenumerate(ar) if v == [5]]
=> [0, 3, 4]
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If you check ndim of your array you will see that it is actually not a multi-dimensional array, but a 1d array of list objects.

You can use the following list comprehension to get the indices where 5 appears:

[i[0] for i,v in np.ndenumerate(a) if 5 in v]
#[0, 2, 3, 4]

Or the following list comprehension to get the indices where the list is exactly [5]:

[i[0] for i,v in np.ndenumerate(a) if v == [5]]
#[0, 3, 4]
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You could use the the list comprehension as here:

[i[0] for i,v in np.ndenumerate(a) if 5 in v]
#[0, 2, 3, 4]
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