Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am reading book named "Fundamentals of Database Systems by R.Elmasri and S.B.Navathe" on the page number 597 second paragraph " A file of records ....".

A file of records with optional fields can be formatted in different ways. If the total number of fields for the record type is large, but the number of fields that actually appear in a typical record is small, we can include in each record a sequence of <field-name, field-value> pairs rather than just the field values. Three types of separator characters are used in Figure 17.5(c), although we could use the same separator character for the first two purposes—separating the field name from the field value and separating one field from the next field. A more practical option is to assign a short field type code—say, an integer number—to each field and include in each record a sequence of <field-type, field-value> pairs rather than <field-name, field-value> pairs.

I am unable to understand What they are trying to say by or I mean for what purpose.If you can explain it with the example then it will be more beneficiary for me. What they want to say by total number of fields for the record type is larger but the number of fields that actually appear in a typical record is small, we can include in each record a sequence of pairs rather than just the field values.

share|improve this question
    
Your question and your title refer to different paragraphs. Which paragraph is it? –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Aug 3 '13 at 12:25
    
I am talking about 6th edition of the book. And the paragraph number is 2. –  user2109547 Aug 3 '13 at 18:46
    
Then you might want to edit your question. That paragraph has nothing to do with repeating fields. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Aug 3 '13 at 19:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.