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I played a little bit with Serialization lately in order to be prepared for the OCPJP7 exam. I hence tried to serialize the following class:

class TempClass  implements Serializable {  
        int secCounter;   
        static int counter;  
        {  
                counter++;  
        }  
        {  
        secCounter=counter;  

then when I try to write the object to a FileOutputStream with the following:

TempClass temp = new TempClass();  
ObjectOutputStream obi = new ObjectOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(file));   
obi.writeObject(temp);  
obi.writeUnshared(temp);  
obi.writeUnshared(temp);  

So here I get 3 different objects when I read them back with an ObjectInputStream, therefore 3 objects have been created. However the final value of secCounter, which is an instance variable so can be serialized, is 1 instead of 3. 1 is the number of time I called the new keyword, So I supposed the constructor gets handled in a different way when an object is created with obi.writeUnshared(object). Does anybody know what exactly happens? I know that static variables are not serialized however in the above posted code I copied the value from the static variable to the instance variable secCounter. So again eventually checking the value of secCounter which is serialized successfully won't get me the expected (at least to me) result but 1.

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Nimbers of objects created during serialization ...

Zero objects are created during serialization, for the purposes of this question.

therefore 3 objects have been created.

No objects are created by writeUnshared(). Objects are created when deserializing.

However the final value of secCounter, which is an instance variable so can be serialized, is 1 instead of 3.

Proves the point. No objects are created when serializing.

1 is the number of time I called the new keyword, So I supposed the constructor gets handled in a different way when an object is created with obi.writeUnshared()

Once again, no objects are created by this method. No constructor is called. What doesn't happen in writeUnshared() is serialization of a 'handle' to an existing serialized object. The object as it is now is serialized, instead of a handle that will be deserialized as a reference to a previously deserialized instance.

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Problem is when he reads them back, not when he is serializing. –  morgano Aug 3 '13 at 9:42
    
@morgano Exactly so. –  EJP Aug 3 '13 at 9:45
    
@EJP however when I read them back they have different toString() therefore are different objects.. and yet even with the last read one, th value of secCounter is still 1. –  Rollerball Aug 3 '13 at 9:49
    
@Rolerball Exactly. You are confused about when the 'replication' or 'cloning' or 'construction' happens. It doesn't happen at the sender, or via construction, so the code you are expecting to be executed doesn't execute. –  EJP Aug 3 '13 at 9:51
    
@EJP However the final result is that I have 3 different objects. I am aware how the first one got created, I did with "new". What about the other two? When do they get created? I am talking about the ones serialized with write.Unshared() and then read back and put in a reference. –  Rollerball Aug 3 '13 at 9:54

During deserialization constructors (or initializers, like in your case) are not executed, this is because when you deserialize an object you highly probably expect the internal state of the object being the same as the state of the original object. Running initializers or constructors could have "side effects" like modifying the internal state of your object.

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So what would be the advantage of having a new (yet the same) object? Would not it be better to just use writeObject(ob) which does not create a clone? –  Rollerball Aug 3 '13 at 9:27
    
@Rollerball writeUnshared() doesn't 'create a clone' either. Your understanding of the process is badly flawed. –  EJP Aug 3 '13 at 9:37
    
@EJP ok I should have "" the word clone.. did not mean clone as the same as using clone() method, My bad sorry about that. However I mean another object with the same state of the one "shared" hence written by writeObject rather than writeUnshared –  Rollerball Aug 3 '13 at 9:45
    
If you deserialize with ObjectInputStream.readObject() you will have "clones" of the object (objects with equal internal state), perhaps that's the reason of having writeUnshared, but I'm not sure about that one to be honest. –  morgano Aug 3 '13 at 9:46
    
@Rollerball You need to understand the difference between what you wrote and what you now say you meant. No creation occurs when sending, ergo no value change occurs. –  EJP Aug 3 '13 at 9:47

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