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I am using a helper class and was wondering what is actually the difference between using an Acitvity object and using a Context object.

Say I have a class and say that I create a helper object in that class like this:

Helper h = new Helper(this);

Now I can set up my helper class like this:

public class Helper {
    private Activity a;

    public Helper(Activity a) {
        this.a = a;
    }
}

Or I can do this:

public class Helper {
    private Context c;

    public Helper(Context c) {
        this.c = c;
    }
}

When should I use which approach? What are the pros and cons?

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2  
Activity IS a Context, that is, it extends Context. Please read the documentation on this. You should not create an instance of an Activity class other than launching it via an Intent or by calling startActivity. Therefore, no pros and cons since you should not use the first pattern. – Simon Aug 3 '13 at 11:14

using:

public Helper(Activity a) {
        this.a = a;
    }

is more specific than using:

public Helper(Context c) {
        this.c = c;
    }

which means (for example) if you called Helper(MainActivity); it will refer to Helper(Activity a) first, if you had two constructors "with different return type!" . similar to: Class(Object o) and Class(String s) calling Class(null) will cause a respond by Class(String s) not Class(Object o)

Context is the Base Object so every Activity extends Context:

java.lang.Object
  ↳ android.content.Context
      ↳ android.content.ContextWrapper
          ↳ android.view.ContextThemeWrapper
              ↳ android.app.Activity

Documentation

Hope this will help.

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