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I am newbie to Python and I have a doubt regarding insert operation on the list.

Example 1:

mylist = ['a','b','c','d','e']
mylist.insert(len(mylist),'f')
print(mylist)

Output:

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f']

Example 2:

mylist = ['a','b','c','d','e']
mylist.insert(10,'f')
print(mylist)

Output:

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f']

In second example why it still inserts 'f' element in the list even if I am giving index 10 to insert method?

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1  
What do you expect the other indexes to contain if it did put 'f' in the 10th index? –  Volatility Aug 3 '13 at 13:26
1  
@Volatility a not unreasonable assumption would be an error of some sort –  Jon Clements Aug 3 '13 at 13:32
1  
I was expecting error. Why it's working that way and not giving any error. –  vivek ratnaparkhi Aug 3 '13 at 13:33
    
@vivekratnaparkhi If you really thing it is wrong, submit a Python Enhancement Proposal. Note: There are no more changes, ever, to existing interfaces in the Python 2.x family. –  Eric Urban Aug 3 '13 at 17:53

2 Answers 2

The list.insert function will insert before the specified index. Since the list is not that long anyways in your example, it goes on the end. Why not just use list.append if you want to put stuff on the end anyways.

x = ['a']
x.append('b')
print x

Output is

['a', 'b']
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Thanks for your answer but it didn't cleared my doubt. –  vivek ratnaparkhi Aug 3 '13 at 13:39
1  
@vivekratnaparkhi : This behaviour is clearly stated in the Python Docs. Quoting - a.insert(0, x) inserts at the front of the list, and a.insert(len(a), x) is equivalent to a.append(x). –  Sukrit Kalra Aug 3 '13 at 13:42
1  
@vivekratnaparkhi If you want the philisophical answer, read up on the principle of least astonishment. –  Eric Urban Aug 3 '13 at 13:43
1  
The OP is not talking about using insert to add to the end of a list per se... he expected that trying to insert at a position way past the end of the list might raise an error (probably IndexError). i.e, why should a.insert(len(a), x) be equivalent to a.insert(len(a)+1000000000, x). That, I'm guessing, is where the doubt still lies. –  SethMMorton Aug 3 '13 at 17:27
    
@SethMMorton: Yes. This is what I wanted to say. –  vivek ratnaparkhi Aug 4 '13 at 10:58

The concept here is "insert before the element with this index". To be able to insert at the end, you have to allow the invalid off-the-end index. Since there are no well-defined "off-the-end iterators" or anything in Python, it makes more sense to just allow all indices than to allow one invalid one, but no others.

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It's making sense. Thanks. –  vivek ratnaparkhi Aug 3 '13 at 14:10

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