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I am having a form with lots of entries. I would like to change my focus to the next textbox, once i entered the value in the current textbox. and want to continue this process upto the last field. My question is, is it possible to simulate tab key through javascript coding once i enter the value in the text box.

Without pressing the tab key in keyboard, i would like to bring the same functionality through javascript. Is this possible ?

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This sucks, I am looking for a tab key and answers here only give next .focus(). –  Qwerty May 12 at 18:54

4 Answers 4

you just need to give focus to the next input field (by invoking focus()method on that input element), for example if you're using jQuery this code will simulate the tab key when enter is pressed:

var inputs = $(':input').keypress(function(e){ 
    if (e.which == 13) {
       e.preventDefault();
       var nextInput = inputs.get(inputs.index(this) + 1);
       if (nextInput) {
          nextInput.focus();
       }
    }
});
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3  
@John jQuery is a JavaScript library, so any "jquery code" is also valid JavaScript code. I've answered this question 3 years ago and in my answer I've put "if you're using jQuery". If someone asked me (back then) to provide "vanilla js" solution I'd probably do it. I just don't understand people like you (no offense intended) going trough really old questions and down voting people's answers. It seems like you're doing it just for fun... –  krcko Aug 30 '12 at 21:22
1  
No, jquery is a overbloated and relies on proprietary Microsoft JScript methods like innerHTML which are not compatible with the DOM. People blindly use it just because others do and it's a resource hog. Endless times I've seen it cause trouble. This question was relevant to me when I encountered your answer. Because there are more amateurs than actual programmers it was necessary to make it clear to people that blindly using jQuery is not acceptable. I stand by my earlier decision and if you do revise your answer I'll still retract my vote. –  John Aug 31 '12 at 11:35
    
@John I don't really know what innerHTML has to do with traversing DOM tree and focusing an element (as in example I gave) but FYI innerHTML is part of HTML 5 working draft (and I might add - finally!). Anyway, it might not be standardized until now, but is was surely supported by all major browsers for a long time. –  krcko Aug 31 '12 at 12:33
5  
And I stand by my earlier statement that code I've gave is self-explanatory and in case you're not using jQuery you should be able to understand the concept behind it and apply it to library of your choice, or even to vanilla javascript if you're a masochist (or you just have enough time to spend on solving long ago solved problems). –  krcko Aug 31 '12 at 12:35
1  
A non-standard broken proprietary method added to a standard blindly is still a non-standard broken proprietary method and doesn't add an ounce of justification for using it. jQuery is blatantly bloated on top of that and everything can already be done without jQuery. Writing cross-browser code is as simple as object detection which if you can't do as a programmer means you don't understand the simplest aspect of JavaScript. I stand by what I said, if you promote poor coding practices it should be pointed out so others don't blindly use it. –  John Aug 31 '12 at 13:37
function nextField(current){
    for (i = 0; i < current.form.elements.length; i++){
        if (current.form.elements[i].tabIndex == current.tabIndex+1){
            current.form.elements[i].focus();
            if (current.form.elements[i].type == "text"){
                current.form.elements[i].select();
            }
        }
    }
}

This, when supplied with the current field, will jump focus to the field with the next tab index. Usage would be as follows

<input type="text" onEvent="nextField(this);" />
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Needed to emulate the tab functionality a while ago, and now I've released it as a library that uses .

EmulateTab: A jQuery plugin to emulate tabbing between elements on a page.

You can see how it works in the demo.

if (myTextHasBeenFilledWithText) {
  // Tab to the next input after #my-text-input
  $("#my-text-input").emulateTab();
}
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Down-voted for answering a JavaScript question with jQuery. If you revise it and reply I'll be happy to retract my vote. –  John Aug 13 '12 at 21:26
1  
@John: thank you for your opinion. –  Joel Purra Aug 13 '12 at 21:46
2  
EmulateTab is a great solution to this problem. Sure, it's jquery, but it's still relevant to the question IMO –  DarinH Jul 29 '13 at 15:04
1  
Upvoted for actually emulating the tab keypress, all other answers are useless. –  Qwerty May 12 at 18:52

In the first question, you don't need an event listener on every input that would be wasteful.

Instead, listen for the enter key and to find the currently focused element use document.activeElement

window.onkeypress = function(e) {
    if (e.which == 13) {
       e.preventDefault();
       var nextInput = inputs.get(inputs.index(document.activeElement) + 1);
       if (nextInput) {
          nextInput.focus();
       }
    }
};

One event listener is better than many, especially on low power / mobile browsers.

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