Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is how I want it to look:

header with half circle at bottom

I realize this is an ugly mockup and obviously when I do it for real the proportions will look better, but I am wondering how you would go about doing this with CSS.

fiddle is here http://jsfiddle.net/bU3QS/1/

<div class="header">
    </div>

.header {
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100%;
    background: #000;
    z-index: 10000;
    height: 110px;
    overflow: hidden;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use the :after pseudo element:

.header:after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    background: black;
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px;
    z-index: 1;
    border-radius: 50%;    /* Makes the element circular */
    bottom: -25px;
    left: 50%;
    margin-left: -25px;
}

For this solution, overflow: hidden; has been removed from the .header CSS.

Here's a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/t97AX/

Here's another approach, that doesn't rely on the width of the semicircle to center it properly:

.header:after {
    content: '';
    position: relative;
    top: 100%;
    display: block;
    margin: 0 auto;
    background: red;
    width: 50px;
    height: 25px;
    border-radius: 0 0 50px 50px;
}

The fiddle (semicircle red for the sake of clarity): http://jsfiddle.net/x4mdC/

More on :before and :after: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/selector.html#before-and-after

share|improve this answer
    
This way, you don't need to add further elements inside the header. –  Nicklas Nygren Aug 3 '13 at 13:53
1  
Upvote because this is by far the most elegant solution, and no additional markup is needed (plus, stylistic items like this should not be in the markup to begin with) :) –  Terry Aug 3 '13 at 13:55
2  
Use border-radius: 50%; just to be sure when the dimensions are edited. –  Bram Vanroy Aug 3 '13 at 13:57
1  
Thanks @Nick! I'm pretty sure the border-radius doesn't have to be the full width of the element though, as it is a radius, and not a diameter. Am I missing something? –  Nicklas Nygren Aug 3 '13 at 14:10
1  
@Michael very nice. But that way the border-radius percent solution won't work. –  Nicklas Nygren Aug 3 '13 at 14:38

Use :after and border-radius to create the semicircle.

.header {
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    background-color: #000;
    height: 110px;
    }
.header:after {
    content: '';
    background-color: red;
    position: absolute;
    display: block;
    width: 100px;
    top: 110px;
    left: 50%;
    margin-left: -50px;
    height: 50px;
    border-radius: 0 0 50px 50px;
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/bU3QS/2/

share|improve this answer
<div class="header">
    <div class="circle">
    </div>
    </div>
.header {
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100%;
    background: #000;
    height: 110px;
}

.circle {
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    border-radius: 100px;
    background-color: black;
    margin: auto;
    position: relative;
    top:45px;
}

in action: http://jsfiddle.net/NickWilde/ngcce/

share|improve this answer
    
This should not be the answer, unless you need to interact with the circle using javascript. It is not content but decoration and should use an :after pseudo element. –  Michael Lawton Aug 3 '13 at 14:01
    
If it was on my own site I would definitely use a div and then style it rather than using after so that I can see without going into the style external file why the heck there is a circle somewhere. After may have it's uses but I don't like there not being a relatively clear reason for everything without switching back and forth between files. –  Nick Wilde Aug 3 '13 at 14:05
    
You can see the pseudo element on most browser debugging tools (F12) –  Michael Lawton Aug 3 '13 at 14:12
    
Yes I know; Unless there is some performance improvement that I don't know about, to me it is a personal preference - I mean if I saw a good argument for why using :after is always better then I might change my preference. –  Nick Wilde Aug 3 '13 at 18:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.