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I'm using ASP.Net MVC 5 from Visual Studio. I want to create a user profile with complex types. I have modified the code of the User class in IdentityModels.cs file. Here's the code:

public class User : IUser
{
    public User()
        : this(String.Empty)
    {
    }

    public User(string userName)
    {
        UserName = userName;
        Id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    }

    [Key]
    public string Id { get; set; }

    public string UserName { get; set; }

    public string Phone { get; set; }
    public string MobilePhone { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }
}

I've also changed the views for this model. This works great without any problems. However, if I change the type of the Address property above to Address, meaning: public Address Address { get; set; } it fails.

I've tried using the virtual keyword for it but it didn't work. Please note that every time I create the database tables from scratch. Also, I checked the database and the information is inserted into database with correct foreign keys but I don't know what the problem is.

The code execution fails in the code below in the line await Users.Create(user) which returns false:

    public async Task<ActionResult> Register(RegisterViewModel model)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            try
            {
                // Create a profile, password, and link the local login before signing in the user
                User user = new User(model.UserName)
                {
                    UserAddress = model.Address,
                    Email = model.Email,
                    Phone = model.Phone,
                    MobilePhone = model.MobilePhone
                };
                if (await Users.Create(user) &&
                    await Secrets.Create(new UserSecret(model.UserName, model.Password)) &&
                    await Logins.Add(new UserLogin(user.Id, IdentityConfig.LocalLoginProvider, model.UserName)))
                {
                    await SignIn(user.Id, isPersistent: false);
                    return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
                }
                else
                {
                    ModelState.AddModelError(String.Empty, "Failed to create login for: " + model.UserName);
                }
            }
            catch (DbEntityValidationException e)
            {
                ModelState.AddModelError("", e.EntityValidationErrors.First().ValidationErrors.First().ErrorMessage);
            }
        }

        // If we got this far, something failed, redisplay form
        return View(model);
    }

Update:

Here's the Address class in case you wonder:

public class Address
{
    public int ID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Country { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string City { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Street { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string PostalCode { get; set; }
}

Update 2

Here's the image of the entered data: enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
What do your Address model look like? –  JasCav Aug 3 '13 at 13:55
    
@JasCav Updated the question and added Address class. However, I doubt that there's something causing the problem there... –  Alireza Noori Aug 3 '13 at 14:03
    
Just to double-check - you're using Entity Framework here, correct? (If that's the case, then there is a problem with Address.) I'm making that assumption via the [Key] Data Annotation that is on your user model. –  JasCav Aug 3 '13 at 14:12
    
Yes I'm using Entity Framework. –  Alireza Noori Aug 3 '13 at 14:22
    
Can you also post what is happening in "Users.Create(user)" (that call) - particularly because that is failing? What's the error message you're receiving as well? –  JasCav Aug 3 '13 at 14:54

2 Answers 2

It seems that this is a bug. I won't select this as the answer until it is absolutely proven. However when I change my controller's code from:

                if (await Users.Create(user) &&
                    await Secrets.Create...

to:

                await Users.Create(user);
                if (await Secrets.Create...

it works without any problems. Seems to me that this should be a bug since I can load and edit the data perfectly.

This means that for some reason, even if the IUserStore.Create succeeds, it returns false in case the model is a complex type.

share|improve this answer

The problem that you have here (at least specific to changing Address to be an object rather than a string), is that your models aren't built correctly to relate them properly. Here is what you should be looking at.

public class User : IUser
{
    public User()
        : this(String.Empty)
    {
    }

    public User(string userName)
    {
        UserName = userName;
        Id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    }

    [Key]
    public string Id { get; set; }    
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    public string Phone { get; set; }
    public string MobilePhone { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }

    // This FK doesn't need to explicitly be declared, but I do so as it helps me
    // with the understanding of my structure a bit better.
    public int AddressId { get; set; }
    public Address Address { get; set; }
}

You also need to relate your Address back to your User class. I'm not sure how you want to do that, but, assuming that multiple people can live at the same address, you'll want a one-to-many relationship. (Right now, you receive an error because you don't specify the relationship.)

You have to do this in the Address model:

public class Address
{
    [Key]
    public int ID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Country { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string City { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Street { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string PostalCode { get; set; }

    // I would give this a better property name than "Users" but just putting
    // this here for now.
    public virtual ICollection<User> Users { get; set; }
}

This way, when your database builds, Entity Framework can now properly build the relationships (where, before, it couldn't tell what you intended - hence the error when you switch over to Address).

Of course, there may be other issues, but, this is one that would cause problems.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this but didn't change much. I think EF is understanding the relationship well since the data entered into the tables is correct. The error message for when the EF doesn't understand the relationship is different. Please take a look at the image for the question –  Alireza Noori Aug 3 '13 at 14:29

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