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Why are the lines (via linesGrob) not drawn in the following plot?

require(gtable)
base <- gtable(widths=unit(rep(1, 2), "null"),
               heights=unit(rep(1, 3), "null"))
grid.newpage()
g <- 1
for(i in 1:3) {
    for(j in 1:2) {
        base <- gtable_add_grob(base,
                                grobs=list(linesGrob(x=1:4, y=4:1),
                                           rectGrob(gp=gpar(fill="#FF0000")),
                                           textGrob(label=g)), i, j, name=1:3)
        g <- g+1
    }
}
grid.draw(base)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two reasons:

  • the coordinates fall outside the viewport

  • the rectGrob is drawn on top and masks it


require(gtable)
# let's fix this name before it's too late
gtable_add_grobs <- gtable_add_grob

base <- gtable(widths=unit(rep(1, 2), "null"),
               heights=unit(rep(1, 3), "null"))
grid.newpage()
g <- 1
for(i in 1:3) {
    for(j in 1:2) {
        base <- gtable_add_grobs(base,
                                grobs=list(rectGrob(gp=gpar(fill="#FF0000")),
                                           linesGrob(x=1:4, y=4:1, def="native", 
                                                     vp=dataViewport(1:4, 1:4)),
                                           textGrob(label=g)), i, j, name=1:3)
        g <- g+1
    }
}
grid.draw(base)

Note gtable_add_grobs is vectorised, which means you shouldn't have to use for loops, ideally. It's easier if you group all the grobs together first, for a given cell, in a gTree. Here's a simplified version,

library(gtable)

g <- gtable(widths = unit(c(1,1), "null"),
            heights = unit(c(1,1), "null"))


cell <- function(ii)
  grobTree(rectGrob(), 
           linesGrob(1:4, 1:4, default.units="native"), 
           textGrob(ii),
           vp=dataViewport(c(1,4), c(1,4)))

gl <- lapply(1:4, cell)

xy <- expand.grid(1:2, 1:2)

g <- gtable_add_grobs(g, gl, 
                      l=xy[,1],
                      r=xy[,1],
                      t=xy[,2],
                      b=xy[,2])


grid.newpage()
grid.draw(g)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Baptiste. The 2nd reason is clear, but the first (?). All viewports have their default NULL value, so shouldn't the points be just drawn in corresponding rectangle as is in the case a new page is opened. This is something I don't really understand yet... why (and how) do I have to specify that... In 'classical' grid, I would push the viewport and then it would just work. –  Marius Hofert Aug 3 '13 at 14:11
    
each cell of the gtable has a viewport, and when you draw a grob in it you need to make sure the coordinates fit within the viewport. A basic example is grid.newpage(); grid.lines(x=1:4, y=4:1, default.units = "npc"): it draws nothing, because 1:4 are interpreted as normalised coordinates, running from 0 to 1. You need either to rescale your data, or specify a viewport and work with "native" coordinates. –  baptiste Aug 3 '13 at 14:17
    
thanks for the answer, Baptiste. The solution with rescaling the data also works (but is less intuitive/natural). –  Marius Hofert Aug 3 '13 at 14:28
    
@MariusHofert I've added a more natural version to add multiple grobs in one go, without for loops. –  baptiste Aug 3 '13 at 15:06
    
Thanks a lot, Baptiste, I'll have a closer look at it. Does summarizing certain parts in a gTree first avoid having to use different names for all grobs in gTree? The reason why I am asking is stackoverflow.com/questions/18028920/… where the suggested solution uses different names for each rectGrob, textGrob... which is quite tedious. I'd rather have one name such as "panel" for all rectGrob, textGrob, and lineGrob together. –  Marius Hofert Aug 3 '13 at 19:01

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