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I open C:\Python27\python.exe, I type clean_index.py (which is a file located in C:\Python27) and I get:

>>> clean_index.py
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'clean_index' is not defined

What's this all about? I type C:\Python27\clean_index.py, same thing.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use execfile:

>>>execfile('clean_index.py')

or just run it directly (not within the python shell):

$ python clean_index.py

assuming you have python in your path.

Or, use an import in the python shell:

>>>import fibo
>>>fibo.fib(1000)
1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 144 233 377 610 987

Module import sample taken from the docs. The filename is fibo.py.

Since you probably simply want to run the file, I suggest you use the second option.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it is important to clarify that when you say "run it directly" you mean from your normal terminal shell (bash, command prompt, etc.), not the interactive python shell. – SethMMorton Aug 3 '13 at 17:22
    
@SethMMorton Yes I was indicating that you're in the python prompt with >>> but that's a good point, it's kind of unclear – keyser Aug 3 '13 at 17:23
    
Yes, >>> is clear that it's the Python prompt, but for the other prompts you could use $, #, >... There's too many to choose from! I just thought that since the OP thought you could use the Python prompt as a general command line prompt, they would probably be unclear about what to do without explicitly saying to run python clean_index.py in the normal shell. – SethMMorton Aug 3 '13 at 17:31

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