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I'm receiving some data from an HTTP POST which includes what is labelled a GMT Timestamp:

<gmt_timestamp>201308031525</gmt_timestamp>

I then need to take this timestamp and convert it to this format:

MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM

So far I've been trying this:

$ts = $_GET['timestamp'];
$date = DateTime::createFromFormat('ymdHi', $ts);
$fmTimestamp = $date->format('m/d/Y h:i:s A');

but that generates a "PHP Fatal error: Call to a member function format() on a non-object" for the 2nd line. Any idea what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
if you debug $date, you will find the variable is null. createFromFormat() fails to create a date when given input is incorrect, thus return null. – Raptor Aug 3 '13 at 14:55
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have a bug in this line:

$date = DateTime::createFromFormat('ymdHi', $ts);

You need an uppercase Y for the year:

$date = DateTime::createFromFormat('YmdHi', $ts);

A lowercase y indicates "A two digit representation of a year", whereas you need Y ("A full numeric representation of a year, 4 digits"). See the docs here.

You also need to set the timezone before you begin:

date_default_timezone_set('UTC');

(PHP does have a GMT timezone, but it shouldn't be used. UTC behaves the same as GMT within PHP.)

Edit

To get your desired output format of:

MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM

you need to do:

$fmTimestamp = $date->format('m/d/Y H:i');

Also, since you're "receiving some data from an HTTP POST", you need to use $_POST instead of $_GET:

$ts = $_POST['timestamp'];

So the complete code is:

date_default_timezone_set('UTC');
$ts = $_POST['timestamp'];
$date = DateTime::createFromFormat('YmdHi', $ts);
$fmTimestamp = $date->format('m/d/Y H:i');
share|improve this answer

Keep it simple stupid.

$input = $_GET['timestamp']; // 201308031525
$year = (int)substr($input,0,4);
$month = (int)substr($input,4,2);
$date = (int)substr($input,6,2);
$hour = (int)substr($input,8,2);
$minute = (int)substr($input,10);

$date_obj = new DateTime($year . '-' . $month . '-' . $date .' ' . $hour . ':' . $minute);
echo $date_obj->format('m/d/Y h:i:s A');

and the output is:

08/03/2013 03:25:00 PM
share|improve this answer
    
Are you saying that an additional 5 lines of code to extract the date and time elements and cast them to ints, plus concatenating all those elements together into a string for the DateTime constructor, is "simpler" than DateTime::createFromFormat('YmdHi', $ts);? – TachyonVortex Aug 3 '13 at 15:16
    
Just another approach, relax. – Raptor Aug 3 '13 at 15:19

You are not instantiating the object you are trying to use.

Try this approach instead:

$date = new DateTime;
$date->createFromFormat('ymdHi', $ts);
$fmTimestamp = $date->format('m/d/Y h:i:s A');

This is untested, just saying ...

share|improve this answer
1  
You don't need to instantiate a DateTime object, because createFromFormat() is a static method. – TachyonVortex Aug 3 '13 at 14:56

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