Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How does the BLC encode parenthesis? For example, how would this:

λa.λb.λc.(a ((b c) d))

Be encoded in BLC?

Note: the Wikipedia article is not very helpful as it uses an unfamiliar notation and provides only one simple example, which doesn't involve parenthesis, and a very complex example, which is hard to analyze. The paper is similar in that aspect.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you mean the binary encoding based on De Bruijn indices discussed in the Wikipedia, that's actually quite simple. You first need to do De Bruijn encoding, which means replacing the variables with natural numbers denoting the number of λ binders between the variable and its λ binder. In this notation,

λa.λb.λc.(a ((b c) d))

becomes

λλλ 3 ((2 1) d)

where d is some natural number >=4. Since it is unbound in the expression, we can't really tell which number it should be.

Then the encoding itself, defined recursively as

enc(λM) = 00 + enc(M)
enc(MN) = 01 + enc(M) + enc(N)
enc(i) = 1*i + 0

where + denotes string concatenation and * means repetition. Systematically applying this, we get

  enc(λλλ 3 ((2 1) d))
= 00 + enc(λλ 3 ((2 1) d))
= 00 + 00 + enc(λ 3 ((2 1) d))
= 00 + 00 + 00 + enc(3 ((2 1) d))
= 00 + 00 + 00 + 01 + enc(3) + enc((2 1) d)
= 00 + 00 + 00 + 01 + enc(3) + 01 + enc(2 1) + enc(d)
= 00 + 00 + 00 + 01 + enc(3) + 01 + 01 + enc(2) + enc(1) + enc(d)
= 000000011110010111010 + enc(d)

and as you can see, the open parentheses are encoded as 01 while the close parens are not needed in this encoding.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome answer, thank you. So parenthesis are not necessary because 01 already means binary application. Just a question, is this optimal? Because that way to encode numbers seems wasteful. –  Viclib Aug 3 '13 at 17:02
    
@Viclib: You're right, this is using a unary number representation (tally marks) and a binary encoding may be better for complex formulae. It will be harder to define that, though, and I'm not going to try it now -- you need to make sure it doesn't collide with the bit strings representing λ and application. –  larsmans Aug 4 '13 at 8:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.