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Working with Python 2.7, I'm wondering which real advantage has using type unicode instead of str, as both of them seem to be able to hold Unicode strings. Is there any special reason a part from being able to set Unicode codes in unicode strings using scape char \?:

Executing a module with:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

a = 'á'
ua = u'á'
print a, ua

Results in: á, á

EDIT:

More testing using Python shell:

>>> a = 'á'
>>> a
'\xc3\xa1'
>>> ua = u'á'
>>> ua
u'\xe1'
>>> ua.encode('utf8')
'\xc3\xa1'
>>> ua.encode('latin1')
'\xe1'
>>> ua
u'\xe1'

So, the unicode string seems to be encoded using latin1 instead of utf-8 and the raw string is encoded using utf-8? I'm even more confused now! :S

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

unicode, which is python 3's str, is meant to handle text. Text is a sequence of code points which may be bigger than a single byte. Text can be encoded in a specific encoding to represent the text as raw bytes(e.g. utf-8, latin-1...). Note that unicode is not encoded! The internal representation used by python is an implementation detail, and you shouldn't care about it as long as it is able to represent the code points you want.

On the contrary str is a plain sequence of bytes. It does not represent text! In fact, in python 3 str is called bytes.

You can think of unicode as a general representation of some text, which can be encoded in many different ways into a sequence of binary data represented via str.

Some differences that you can see:

>>> len(u'à')  # a single code point
1
>>> len('à')   # by default utf-8 -> takes two bytes
2
>>> len(u'à'.encode('utf-8'))
2
>>> len(u'à'.encode('latin1'))  # in latin1 it takes one byte
1
>>> print u'à'.encode('utf-8')  # terminal encoding is utf-8
à
>>> print u'à'.encode('latin1') # it cannot understand the latin1 byte
�

Note that using str you have a lower-level control on the single bytes of a specific encoding representation, while using unicode you can only control at the code-point level. For example you can do:

>>> 'àèìòù'
'\xc3\xa0\xc3\xa8\xc3\xac\xc3\xb2\xc3\xb9'
>>> print 'àèìòù'.replace('\xa8', '')
à�ìòù

What before was valid UTF-8, isn't anymore. Using a unicode string you cannot operate in such a way that the resulting string isn't valid unicode text. You can remove a code point, replace a code point with a different code point etc. but you cannot mess with the internal representation.

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Thanks a lot for your answer, it helped a lot! The most clarifying part for me is: "unicode is not encoded! The internal representation used by python is an implementation detail, and you shouldn't care about it [...]". So, when serializing unicode objects I guess we first have to explicitly encode() them to the proper encoding format, as we don't know which one is being used internally to represent the unicode value. –  Caumons Aug 3 '13 at 15:45
2  
Yes. When you want to save some text(e.g. to a file) you have to represent it with bytes, i.e. you must encode it. When retrieving the content you should know the encoding that was used, in order to be able to decode the bytes into a unicode object. –  Bakuriu Aug 3 '13 at 15:54
    
Thanks for this! :) –  Caumons Aug 3 '13 at 16:04

Your terminal happens to be configured to UTF-8.

The fact that printing a works is a coincidence; you are writing raw UTF-8 bytes to the terminal. a is a value of length two, containing two bytes, hex values C3 and A1, while ua is a unicode value of length one, containing a codepoint U+00E1.

This difference in length is one major reason to use Unicode values; you cannot easily measure the number of text characters in a byte string; the len() of a byte string tells you how many bytes were used, not how many characters were encoded.

You can see the difference when you encode the unicode value to different output encodings:

>>> a = 'á'
>>> ua = u'á'
>>> ua.encode('utf8')
'\xc3\xa1'
>>> ua.encode('latin1')
'\xe1'
>>> a
'\xc3\xa1'

Note that the first 256 codepoints of the Unicode standard match the Latin 1 standard, so the U+00E1 codepoint is encoded to Latin 1 as a byte with hex value E1.

Furthermore, Python uses escape codes in representations of unicode and byte strings alike, and low code points that are not printable ASCII are represented using \x.. escape values as well. This is why a Unicode string with a code point between 128 and 255 looks just like the Latin 1 encoding. If you have a unicode string with codepoints beyond U+00FF a different escape sequence, \u.... is used instead, with a four-digit hex value.

It looks like you don't yet fully understand what the difference is between Unicode and an encoding. Please do read the following articles before you continue:

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I've edited my question with further testing. I've been reading for unicode and the different encodings for a while and I think I understand the theory, but when actually testing Python code I don't catch what's happening –  Caumons Aug 3 '13 at 15:28
1  
The latin-1 encoding matches the first 256 codepoints of the Unicode standard. This is why U+00E1 encodes to \xe1 in Latin 1. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 3 '13 at 15:32
    
One of these days @martijn you should write an article in this in some kind of community blog... :-D –  Jon Clements Aug 3 '13 at 15:39
    
@Bakuriu's answer stackoverflow.com/a/18034409/955619 clarified my doubt. We don't know the unicode encoding type as it's internal to Python. And this is why it seemed to be encoded using latin1, but we can't rely on this. Thanks for your answer as well! +1 –  Caumons Aug 3 '13 at 15:48
1  
That is the single most important aspect to Unicode. It is not an encoding. It is text. Unicode is a standard that includes much, much more, like information on what codepoints are numbers, or whitespace or other categories, should be displayed left to right or right to left, etc. etc. etc. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 3 '13 at 15:49

When you define a as unicode, the chars a and á are equal. Otherwise á counts as two chars. Try len(a) and len(au). In addition to that, you may need to have the encoding when you work with other environments. For example if you use md5, you get different values for a and ua

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