Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have the following matrix which I believe is sparse. I tried converting to dense using the x.dense format but it never worked. Any suggestions as to how to do this?, thanks.

mx=[[(0, 2), (1, 1), (2, 1), (3, 1), (4, 1), (5, 3), (6, 4), (7, 2), (8, 5), (9, 1)], 
[(10, 1), (11, 5), (12, 2), (13, 1), (21, 1), (22, 1), (23, 1), (24, 1), (25, 1), (26, 2)], 
[(27, 2), (28, 1), (29, 1), (30, 1), (31, 2), (32, 1), (33, 1), (34, 1), (35, 1), (36, 1)]]

someone put forward the solution below, but is there a better way?

def assign_coo_to_dense(sparse, dense):
    dense[sparse.row, sparse.col] = sparse.data

mx.todense(). Intended output should appear in this form:[[2,1,1,1,1,3,4], [1,5,2,1,1,1,1], [2,1,1,1,2,1,1,1]]

share|improve this question
    
Are you using numpy or scipy? – Floris Aug 3 '13 at 16:05
    
Hi Floris, I'm using numpy, but it seems most people have addressed similar problems using scipy. – Tiger1 Aug 3 '13 at 16:09
    
@Tiger1 is mx a matrix containing indices or values? In SciPy you will need a maximum dimension of 2 for the sparse matrix, which does not seem to be your case... – Saullo Castro Aug 3 '13 at 16:12
    
Hi Saullo, indices follow by values. – Tiger1 Aug 3 '13 at 16:14
1  
You need to use x.todense(), not x.dense(). – Akavall Aug 3 '13 at 16:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

List comprehension is the easiest way:

new_list = [[b for _,b in sub] for sub in mx]

Result:

>>> new_list
[[2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3, 4, 2, 5, 1], [1, 5, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2], [2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]]
share|improve this answer
    
Finally an answer that ignores the whole "what kind of data is this" red herring and gets to the "here is how you get from the input you have to the output you want". – Floris Aug 4 '13 at 13:27
    
@AKavall, thanks for the solution. Its exactly what I was looking for. – Tiger1 Aug 4 '13 at 15:42

Your source data do not really match any of the built-in formats supported by sparse matrices in SciPy (see http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/sparse.html and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparse_matrix), so using .todense() will not really be productive here. In particular, if you have something like:

import numpy as np

my_sparseish_matrix = np.array([[(1, 2), (3, 4)]])

then my_sparseish_matrix will already be a dense numpy array ! Calling .todense() on it at that point will produce an error, and doesn't make sense anyway.

So my recommendation is to construct your dense array explicitly using a couple of for loops. To do this you'll need to know how many items are possible in your resulting vector -- call it N.

dense_vector = np.zeros((N, ), int)
for inner in mx:
    for index, value in inner:
        dense_vector[index] = value
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Imjohns3, how can I know the value of N when the actual data set contains thousands of documents (up to a million items)? Here is a code that does that, and also maintains the order of items in the list:q=[] for doc in corpus_tfidf: j=([i[1] for i in doc]) q.append(j) – Tiger1 Aug 3 '13 at 19:13
    
Oh wow, that's totally different than what I thought you were asking ! It would be helpful to specify this in your question. – lmjohns3 Aug 3 '13 at 20:01
    
Hi Imjohns3, thanks for the solution. it worked but each item is supposed to be a list; values separated by comma.See question for update. Thanks – Tiger1 Aug 4 '13 at 5:50

Here's a pretty hacky way to do what you're asking for :

dense = [[int(''.join(str(val) for _, val in doc))] for doc in mx]

Basically it converts each value from the nested tuples into a string and concatenates all of those strings together, then converts that back to an integer. Repeat for each element of mx.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.