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I'm a Ruby beginner who's trying to add multiple categories to my hangman game.

I know how to choose a random element from an array. For example:

animals = ['dog', 'cat', 'mouse']
random = animals[rand(animals.length)] 
puts random

However, I want to choose an entire array randomly, and then a single random element from that random array. For example:

animals = ['dog', 'cat', 'mouse']
planets = [['jupiter'], ['mars']]
fruits = [['apple'], ['orange'], ['mango']]

categories =[[animals], [planets], [fruits]]

#the code I tried was:
random_array = categories[rand(categories.length)]
random_element = random_array[rand(random_array.length)]
puts random_element

But this puts an entire array, instead of one element. Please help! Thanks

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Why is each element of planets and fruits an array and not a string? Why is each element of categories within an extra layer of an array? –  sawa Aug 3 '13 at 16:56

6 Answers 6

animals = ['dog', 'cat', 'mouse']
planets = [['jupiter'], ['mars']]
fruits = [['apple'], ['orange'], ['mango']]

categories = [animals, planets, fruits]
puts categories.sample.sample #=> jupiter

As Sawa remarks, this would return either a string or one of the sub-arrays. *categories.sample.sample (a splat) always retuns a string.

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+1 for the much-simpler usage of sample. –  Andrew Marshall Aug 3 '13 at 16:50
1  
You would get ["jupiter"], not "jupiter". –  sawa Aug 3 '13 at 16:54
    
@sawa Ah, yes - but it doesn't show because of the puts. –  steenslag Aug 3 '13 at 20:05

your code is correct, but array initialization is not. Here's what you have to do:

animals = ['dog', 'cat', 'mouse']
planets = ['jupiter', 'mars'] 
fruits = ['apple', 'orange', 'mango']

categories = [animals, planets, fruits]

In your code, animals is array, planets and fruits are arrays of arrays, and categories is array of three arrays, inside of each one is one of you variables

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Why not flatten them all or is that an overkill

a = (animals.flatten + fruits.flatten + planets.flatten)
r = a[rand(a.flatten.size)]
=> "dog"

You might also use the more efficient << to concatenate arrays.

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1  
(animals + fruits + planets).flatten is equivalent, shorter, and likely more performant. –  Andrew Marshall Aug 3 '13 at 16:51
    
I would go with [*animals, *fruits, *planets]. –  sawa Aug 3 '13 at 16:58
    
@AndrewMarshall << is appending to the array returned by the previous flatten call. While + is creating new arrays and pushing all the elements into it. So there are 2 new arrays instead of a single one had we used << (append) –  bsd Aug 3 '13 at 16:58
    
@sawa Hey that's even more elegant ! –  bsd Aug 3 '13 at 17:00
    
I meant than what you actually had (on line 1), not what you suggest (<<). I’m well aware of the differences between Array#+ & Array#<<. –  Andrew Marshall Aug 3 '13 at 17:01

This should be the shortest and cleanest way to do it.

animals = ['dog', 'cat', 'mouse']
planets = [['jupiter'], ['mars']]
fruits = [['apple'], ['orange'], ['mango']]

[animals, planets, fruits].flatten.sample

#flatten returns a new array with all elements but in just one dimension.

#sample returns one random element from you array

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What you have should work, it's your categories array that's not working. It supposed to be:

categories =[animals, planets, fruits]

and not a mix of arrays within an array.

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