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I have read that GOTO is bad, but how do I avoid it? I don't know how to program without GOTO. In BASIC I used GOTO for everything. What should I use instead in C and C++?

I used GOTO in BASIC like this:

MainLoop:
INPUT string$   
IF string$ = "game" THEN   
GOTO game
ENDIF
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1  
Loops, if-then-else, etc. Just read any good book on C or C++; it probably won't mention goto in the early chapters. –  larsmans Aug 3 '13 at 16:37
2  
function calls, loops, switch statements, polymorphism. I never encountered a situation where I needed goto in C++. –  juanchopanza Aug 3 '13 at 16:38
1  
You can use goto instead of GOTO in C/C++. ;-) –  James McLaughlin Aug 3 '13 at 16:38
6  
Please get a good book and learn some of the language first. As you learn about things such as loops and functions you will start to realize that goto is not necessary. –  Captain Obvlious Aug 3 '13 at 16:49
1  
Also note that in C++, goto could seriously mess things up. So it is not only less likely that you will need it in C++, it is more likely that it will break your program. –  juanchopanza Aug 3 '13 at 17:02

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Usually loops like for, while and do while and functions have more or less disposed the need of using GOTO. Learn about using those and after a few examples you won't think about goto anymore. :)

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Thankyou, but in BASIC i used goto to call subroutines. How do I do that in C and C++? –  I programmed HAL 9000 Aug 3 '13 at 16:43
    
You can not call subroutines with gotos. :) –  Devolus Aug 3 '13 at 16:47
1  
@user2648991 learn about functions in C and C++ and function calls. It os usually very well documented in any C/C++ beginners gude. –  DaMachk Aug 3 '13 at 16:57
    
actually I looked online and there is something called a tail call. –  I programmed HAL 9000 Aug 4 '13 at 1:52
    
Tail call si not yet something you should bother yourself about. For now learn to create an use functions properly and usage of pointers, structs, later classes (C++)... If you need help i can try and explain the usage with an email or so... –  DaMachk Aug 4 '13 at 8:36

goto is not inherently bad, it has it's uses, just like any other language feature. You can completely avoid using goto, by using exceptions, try/catch, and loops as well as appropriate if/else constructs.

However, if you realize that you get extremly out of your way, just to avoid it, it might be an indiaction that it would be better to use it.

Personally I use goto to implement functions with single entry and exit points, which makes the code much more readable. This is the only thing where I still find goto usefull and actually improves the structure and readabillity of the code.

As an example:

int foo()
{
    int fd1 = -1;
    int fd2 = -1;
    int fd3 = -1;

    fd1 = open();
    if(fd1 == -1)
        goto Quit:

    fd2 = open();
    if(fd2 == -1)
        goto Quit:

    fd3 = open();
    if(fd3 == -1)
        goto Quit:

     ... do your stuff here ...

Quit:
   if(fd1 != -1)
      closefile();

   if(fd2 != -1)
      closefile();

   if(fd3 != -1)
      closefile();
}

In C++ you find, that the need for such structures might be drastically reduced, if you properly implement classes which encapsulate access to resources. For example using smartpointer are such an example.

In the above sample, you would implement/use a file class in C++, so that, when it gets destructed, the file handle is also closed. Using classes, also has the advantage that it will work when exceptions are thrown, because then the compiler ensures that all objects are properly destructed. So in C++ you should definitely use classes with destructors, to achieve this.

When you want to code in C, you should consider that extra blocks also add additional complexity to the code, which in turn makes the code harder to understand and to control. I would prefer a well placed goto anytime over a series of artifical if/else clauses just to avoid it. And if you later have to revisit the code, you can still understand it, without following all the extra blocks.

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2  
You might also mention, that this use of goto is actually part of the linux styleguide :-) –  cmaster Aug 3 '13 at 16:46
    
@cmaster, I didn't know that. :) –  Devolus Aug 3 '13 at 16:47
    
Yes, this is an example where goto helps readability, but that isn't what the question asks. The question asks when not to use goto (where the OP would use GOTO in the equivalent BASIC code because of limitations of the language) –  hvd Aug 3 '13 at 16:53
5  
In C++, this is a bad example, as it's better done using the RAII pattern. Then, you can just return or throw an exception in case something goes wrong, and cleanup happens automatically. But I agree that in C this pattern can occasionally be useful. –  Thomas Aug 3 '13 at 16:58
3  
You briefly mentioned some other points, but if I were the OP, and I were reading this answer, I would read it as "it's okay to just continue using goto". In that light, your answer is correct, but probably unhelpful. However, I cannot judge if this is how others interpret your answer as well, and if others don't, please do disregard my comment. –  hvd Aug 3 '13 at 16:59

goto is now displaced by other programming constructs like for, while, do-while etc, which are easier to read. But goto still has it's uses. I use it in a situation where different code blocks in a function (for e.g., which involve different conditional checks) have a single exit point. Apart from this one use for every other thing you should use appropriate programming constructs.

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Edsger Dijkstra published a famous letter titled Go To Statement Considered Harmful. You should read about it, he advocated for structured programming. That wikipedia article describes what you need to know about structured programming. You can write structured programs with goto, but that is not a popular view these days, for that perspective read Donald Knuth's Structured Programming with goto Statements.

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There are several reasons to use goto, the main would be: conditional execution, loops and "exit" routine.

Conditional execution is managed by if/else generally, and it should be enough

Loops are managed by for, while and do while; and are furthermore reinforced by continue and break

The most difficult would be the "exit" routine, in C++ however it is replaced by deterministic execution of destructors. So to make you call a routine on exiting a function, you simply create an object that will perform the action you need in its destructor: immediate advantages are that you cannot forget to execute the action when adding one return and that it'll work even in the presence of exceptions.

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Consider the following piece of C++ code:

void broken()
{
    int i = rand() % 10;
    if (i == 0) // 1 in 10 chance.
        goto iHaveABadFeelingAboutThis;

    std::string cake = "a lie";

    // ...
    // lots of code that prepares the cake
    // ...

iHaveABadFeelingAboutThis:
    // 1 time out of ten, the cake really is a lie.
    eat(cake);

    // maybe this is where "iHaveABadFeelingAboutThis" was supposed to be?
    std::cout << "Thank you for calling" << std::endl;
}

Ultimately, "goto" is not much different than C++'s other flow-control keywords: "break", "continue", "throw", etc; functionally it introduces some scope-related issues as demonstrated above.

Relying on goto will teach you bad habits that produce difficult to read, difficult to debug and difficult to maintain code, and it will generally tend to lead to bugs. Why? Because goto is free-form in the worst possible way, and it lets you bypass structural controls built into the language, such as scope rules, etc.

Few of the alternatives are particularly intuitive, and some of them are arguably as ambiguous as "goto", but at least you are operating within the structure of the language - referring back to the above sample, it's much harder to do what we did in the above example with anything but goto (of course, you can still shoot yourself in the foot with for/while/throw when working with pointers).

Your options for avoiding it and using the language's natural flow control constructs to keep code humanly readable and maintainable:

  • Break your code up into subroutines.

Don't be afraid of small, discrete, well-named functions, as long as you are not perpetually hauling a massive list of arguments around (if you are, then you probably want to look at encapsulating with a class).

Many novices use "goto" because they write ridiculously long functions and then find that they want to get from line 2 of a 3000 line function to line 2998. In the above code, the bug created by goto is much harder to create if you split the function into two payloads, the logic and the functional.

void haveCake() {
    std::string cake = "a lie";

    // ...
    // lots of code that prepares the cake
    // ...

    eat(cake);
}

void foo() {
    int i = rand() % 10;
    if (i != 0) // 9 times out of 10
        haveCake();
    std::cout << "Thanks for calling" << std::endl;
}   

Some folks refer to this as "hoisting" (I hoisted everything that needed to be scoped with 'cake' into the haveCake function).

  • One-shot for loops.

These are not always obvious to programmers starting out, it says it's a for/while/do loop but it's actually only intended to run once.

for ( ; ; ) { // 1-shot for loop.
    int i = rand() % 10;
    if (i == 0) // 1 time in 10
         break;
    std::string cake = "a lie";
    // << all the cakey goodness.

    // And here's the weakness of this approach.
    // If you don't "break" you may create an infinite loop.
    break;
}

std::cout << "Thanks for calling" << std::endl;
  • Exceptions.

These can be very powerful, but they can also require a lot of boiler plate. Plus you can throw exceptions to be caught further back up the call stack or not at all (and exit the program).

struct OutOfLuck {};

try {
    int i = rand() % 10;
    if (i == 0)
        throw OutOfLuck();
    std::string cake = "a lie";
    // << did you know: cake contains no fat, sugar, salt, calories or chemicals?
    if (cake.size() < MIN_CAKE)
        throw CakeError("WTF is this? I asked for cake, not muffin");
}
catch (OutOfLuck&) {} // we don't catch CakeError, that's Someone Else's Problem(TM).

std::cout << "Thanks for calling" << std::endl;

Formally, you should try and derive your exceptions from std::exception, but I'm sometimes kind of partial to throwing const char* strings, enums and occasionally struct Rock.

try {
    if (creamyGoodness.index() < 11)
        throw "Well, heck, we ran out of cream.";
} catch (const char* wkoft /*what kind of fail today*/) {
    std::cout << "CAKE FAIL: " << wkoft << std::endl;
    throw std::runtime_error(wkoft);
}
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Wow...thats a lot of code for cake... –  I programmed HAL 9000 Aug 4 '13 at 2:47
1  
"did you know: cake contains no fat, sugar, salt, calories or chemicals?" +1 for the laugh, but no. :) –  hvd Aug 4 '13 at 21:58
1  
@hvd caveat emptor, std::string cake = "a lie"; :) –  kfsone Aug 4 '13 at 22:08
    
@kfsone - Plus one for Most entertaining –  ryyker Sep 9 '13 at 23:15
    
+1 for Someone Else's Problem (TM) –  Renan Gemignani Sep 11 '13 at 1:33

BASIC orginally is a intepretation language, it doesn't have structures so it relies on GOTOs to jump the specific line. In this way program flow is hard to follow, making debugging more complicated. Pascal, C and modern language are strongly structured, instructions are executed in blocks. That means "if", then, for, while... will define program flow, which block will be executed next. So there's no need and not recommended to use goto

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Maybe instead of

if(something happens) 
   goto err;

err:
   print_log()

one can use :

do {

    if (something happens)
    {
       seterrbool = true;       
       break;  // You can avoid using using go to I believe
    } 

} while (false) //loop will work only one anyways
if (seterrbool)
   printlog();

It may not seem friendly because in the example above there is only one goto but will be more readable if there are many "goto" .

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This implementation of the function above avoids using goto's. Note, this does NOT contain a loop. The compiler will optimize this. I prefer this implementation.

Using 'break' and 'continue', goto statements can (almost?) always be avoided.

int foo()
{
    int fd1 = -1;
    int fd2 = -1;
    int fd3 = -1;

    do
    {
        fd1 = open();
        if(fd1 == -1)
            break;

        fd2 = open();
        if(fd2 == -1)
            break:

        fd3 = open();
        if(fd3 == -1)
            break;

         ... do your stuff here ...
    }
    while (false);

   if(fd1 != -1)
      closefile();

   if(fd2 != -1)
      closefile();

   if(fd3 != -1)
      closefile();
}
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