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Kinda new at this so let me know if I am formatting things incorrectly. Full disclosure this is for a intro to java class. Would like some general nudges on concepts or some alternate examples. let me try to break this down as simply as I can. We have already built the basis of Yahtzee type dice game in java. Our current instructions are as follows:create a class called Yahtzee. The Yahtzee class holds the five dice for the game. Add the following methods:

Lock: A method to keep a die (that is, to not include the die in the next roll). Hint: Add a lock variable to the die class. Unlock: A method to release a die (that is, to include a die in the next roll) UnlockAll: A method to release all the dice in the Hand. Roll: A method to roll only the released dice. Hint: Change the roll method in the die class to only roll if the die is unlocked. Show: A method to show the current dice values.

Create an abstract class called Player. Add the following methods:

Play: a method to play a round (up to three rolls) Choose: An abstract method to decide which dice to keep or release (called from the Play method) Name: A method to set the Player's name. The constructor for this class calls the method to set the Player's name.

Create a subclass to Player called Human. The Human Player asks the person at the keyboard which dice should be kept or released. It also asks the person at the keyboard for his name when the set Player's name method is called.

Create a subclass to Player called Computer. The Computer Player keeps the dice which has the majority of the the same value and releases the remainder. When asked for its name, it calls itself "Boris."

Your main program establishes a Human and Computer Player. It then tells each to play a round and displays the result of their round. It then asks if another round should be played.

public class OneDice {// class for an individual dice
    private int die;  
    int lock = 0;

        public OneDice() {
        die = (int)(Math.random()*6) + 1;  
        }

        public void roll() {// random 
            if(lock != 1){
            die = (int)(Math.random()*6) + 1;
            }
        }


        public int value() {
              // return the value of the die variable
           return die;
        }

        public void lockDice(){
        lock = 1;
        }

        public void unlockDice(){
        lock = 0;
        }


}

public class Yahtzee extends OneDice {        

     OneDice dice1 = new OneDice();
     OneDice dice2 = new OneDice();
     OneDice dice3 = new OneDice();
     OneDice dice4 = new OneDice();
     OneDice dice5 = new OneDice();

    public Yahtzee(){
      yahtzeeRoll(); //constructor
    }
     public void yahtzeeRoll(){         
     dice1.roll();
     dice2.roll();
     dice3.roll();
     dice4.roll();
     dice5.roll();
    }

//here are my lock and unlock methods of the Yahtzee class

    public void lock(int which){


            switch (which){

            case 1: dice1.lockDice();
                break;
            case 2: dice2.lockDice();
                break;
            case 3: dice3.lockDice();
                break;
            case 4: dice4.lockDice();
                break;
            case 5: dice5.lockDice();
                break;    
            }

       }

        public void unlock(int which){
            switch (which){

            case 1: dice1.unlockDice();
                break;
            case 2: dice2.unlockDice();
                break;
            case 3: dice3.unlockDice();
                break;
            case 4: dice4.unlockDice();
                break;
            case 5: dice5.unlockDice();
                break;    
            }
        }   

         public void unlockAll(){
             dice1.unlockDice();
             dice2.unlockDice();
             dice3.unlockDice();
             dice4.unlockDice();
             dice5.unlockDice();
        }   
       public void printYahtzee(){ //prints the dice
       System.out.println("dice 1 comes up= " + dice1.value());
       System.out.println("dice 2 comes up= " + dice2.value());
       System.out.println("dice 3 comes up= " + dice3.value());
       System.out.println("Dice 4 comes up= " + dice4.value());
       System.out.println("Dice 5 comes up= " + dice5.value());

       }
}

So the instructor helped me all the previous code so more of less that should be solid. Here is my Player class.

public abstract class Player extends Yahtzee  {

private String name;
String choice;
Yahtzee hand = new Yahtzee();

     public Player(){
         getName();
     }    




    public void play(int which){

        while(i <3 ){
        hand.yahtzeeRoll();  
        hand.printYahtzee();
        choose(which);
        }    
    }

should I use the extended methods instead of creating a new object "hand" in the player class? Is that the whole point of inheritance and creating this class?

 abstract public void choose(int which);{
    System.out.println("which would you like to go hold (1), unlock (2), or unlock  all(3)");
    int choice = sc.nextInt();   

         switch (choice){

            case 1: hand.lock(which);
                break;
            case 2: hand.unlock(which);
                break;
            case 3: hand.unlockAll();
                break;
            }

    }   

    public void getName(){
    System.out.println("What is your name?: ");
    name = sc.nextLine();    
    }

    public void setName(){
    System.out.println("Player " + name );    
    }
}

Im trying to make is so my abstract class is passed a " int which" parameter from main to select which dice to lock on unlock. But it does not like my which parameter but it does not mind this parameter in the Yahtzee class/ lock unlock method. Any thoughts? Also I have tried to reread and understand how to use the abstract classes. Would anyone have some hints or suggestions on how to implement my abstract class in the human or computer subclasses. I started working on those sections and it was just a mess.

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Marko Topolnik, bensiu, Jeroen, Michael Härtl, Shadwell Aug 4 '13 at 9:00

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Your style is way to chatty. It could take almost half an hour of fully dedicated concentration to read through all this and formulate an answer. This is not how StackOverflow works; we have an attention span of about 5 minutes per question. You need to adapt your question to that. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 3 '13 at 17:59
    
Totally understand. I dont want to be a burden to the community as I seem to have a few downvotes :/ just looking for help any suggestions aside from stackoverflow? I have tried to look at tutorials and guides but I still having trouble but just wanted actual help from a person. Thanks again. –  landres Aug 3 '13 at 18:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Expanding on @Hovercraft's points, and as discussed here, note that an abstract class can have both concrete and abstract methods. The former are accessible to all subclasses, while the latter must be implemented for each subclass. In this game, both Human and Computer can play(), but each uses a different implementation of choose(). In the example below, note how pressing Play invokes the abstract player.play(), which in turn invokes the correct choose() method belonging to a given concrete subclass. Similarly, the Computer constructor always specifies the name "Boris", while the Human constructor prompts the user for a name.

import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import javax.swing.AbstractAction;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

/**
 * @see http://stackoverflow.com/a/18040085/230513
 */
public class Test {

    private abstract class Player {

        private String name;

        public Player(String name) {
            this.name = name;
        }

        public void play() {
            choose();
        }

        abstract public void choose();

        public void setName(String name) {
            this.name = name;
        }

        public String getName() {
            return name;
        }
    }

    private class Human extends Player {

        public Human() {
            super(JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null, "Name"));
        }

        @Override
        public void choose() {
            System.out.println(getName() + " choosing.");
            // check user selection
        }

        @Override
        public void setName(String name) {
            super.setName(name);
        }
    }

    private class Computer extends Player {

        public Computer() {
            super("Boris");
        }

        @Override
        public void choose() {
            System.out.println(getName() + " choosing.");
            // select majority
        }
    }

    private JPanel createPlayerPanel(final Player player) {
        JPanel panel = new JPanel();
        panel.add(new JLabel(player.getName(), JLabel.CENTER));
        panel.add(new JButton(new AbstractAction("Play") {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                player.play();
            }
        }));
        return panel;
    }

    private void display() {
        JFrame f = new JFrame("Test");
        f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        f.setLayout(new GridLayout(0, 1));
        f.add(createPlayerPanel(new Human()));
        f.add(createPlayerPanel(new Computer()));
        f.pack();
        f.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        f.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                new Test().display();
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
See also this related example. –  trashgod Aug 4 '13 at 21:38

Some suggestions:

  • The Player class should not inherit from Yahtzee since it does not pass the "is-a" test: The concept of a Player object does not represent a specialized version of a Yahtzee object. Your use of inheritance here will not work but rather will only cause problems.
  • An abstract method should not have a "body".

In other words, if you declare a method abstract then just declare it. For example, this is OK:

public abstract void someMethod();

But this isn't:

public abstract void someMethod() {
  System.out.println("hello world");
}

And this definitely isn't allowed:

public abstract void someMethod(); {
  System.out.println("hello world");
}

This question confuses me:

should I use the extended methods instead of creating a new object "hand" in the player class? Is that the whole point of inheritance and creating this class?

Please clarify.

share|improve this answer
1  
I appreciate your time looking through my messy code. In regards to your question. In my abstract class I created a new object of Yahtzee in the play method hand.YahtzeeRoll() and hand.YahtzeePrint.I was curious if it would make more sense to just call the methods of my Yahtzee class rather than create a new object. To be honest I think I just need to do some more research on the purpose of abstract classes and methods. Thanks for clarifying that abstract methods have no body. –  landres Aug 3 '13 at 20:40
1  
Also my instructor writes create "Choose: An abstract method to decide which dice to keep or release (called from the Play method)" My understanding was to put call something from the play method in my abstract method... but that does not seem to be the case. –  landres Aug 3 '13 at 20:52
    
@landres: I inferred that concrete play() was meant to invoke abstract choose(), as suggested here. –  trashgod Aug 4 '13 at 5:50

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