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I am working on a piece of code that requires to find certain characters in a word and then replace those characters in a generated string. The code works fine when the word has only one of each character; however, when I have two or more characters of the same kind, the code only identifies the first one and ignores the following ones. Do you have any suggestions on how to solve this issue?

def write_words (word, al):

newal = (list(al))
n = len(word)
i = 0
x = 0
a = []
b = ["_"]
for i in range(0, n):
    a = a + b
while (x <(len(newal))):
    z = newal[x]
    y = word.find(z)
    x = x + 1
    print (y)
    if y >= 0:
        a[y] = z
return(a)

(The Python version I'm working with is 3.2.1)

share|improve this question
    
Just add a while loop checking y. You will have to scratch out the founds characters in word. –  Jim Aug 3 '13 at 19:23
1  
I don't understand what you want to do. Could you give an example? –  Colonel Panic Aug 3 '13 at 19:26
1  
Anything wrong with word.replace('x', 'y')? What your code does it unclear to me, it's very complicated but does very little. –  Lennart Regebro Aug 3 '13 at 19:28
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3 Answers 3

The problem here is that find() returns the index of the first occurrence of the element.

You can just use the following code to replace the occurrences instead.

>>> word = 'abcdabcd'
>>> ignore = 'ab'
>>> "".join([elem if elem not in ignore else '_' for elem in word])
'__cd__cd'

P.S - Some pointers on your current code.

def write_words (word, al):
    newal = (list(al))
    n = len(word)
    i = 0
    x = 0
    a = []
    b = ["_"]
    for i in range(0, n):
        a = a + b
    while (x <(len(newal))):
        z = newal[x]
        y = word.find(z)
        x = x + 1
        print (y)
        if y >= 0:
            a[y] = z
    return(a)
  1. Instead of doing a for loop and appending _ at every element in a, you could have just done a = ['_']*len(word).
  2. You don't need a while loop here or converting your word to a list. Strings are iterable, so you could just do for elem in newal. That way you don't have to keep a seperate x variable to iterate over the string.

So, now your code gets reduced to

>>> def write_words_two(word, al):
        a = ['_']*len(word)
        for elem in al:
            y = word.find(elem)
            print(y)
            a[y] = z
        return a

But, it still has the same problem as before. The problem now seems to be that word.find(elem) only returns the occurrence of the first character and not the indices of occurrences of all of them. So, instead of building up a list first and then replacing the characters, we should build up the list as we go along and test every character for our ignored characters, and if the character needs to be ignored, we just replace that with it's replacement in the list. Then, we come up with the following code

>>> def write_words_three(word, al, ignore):
        a = []
        for elem in word:
            if elem in al:
                a.append(ignore)
            else:
                a.append(elem)
        return a

>>> write_words_three('abcdabcd', 'ab', '_')
['_', '_', 'c', 'd', '_', '_', 'c', 'd']

But, it still seems to return the list and not the string and that's what we want, and it seems a little big too. So, why not shorten it with a list comprehension?

>>> def write_words_four(word, al, ignore):
        return [elem if elem not in al else ignore for elem in word]

>>> write_words_threefour('abcdabcd', 'ab', '_')
['_', '_', 'c', 'd', '_', '_', 'c', 'd']

We still need a string out of this though and our code just returns a list. We can use the join(...) method for that and join each element of the string.

>>> def write_words_five(word, al, ignore):
        return "".join([elem if elem not in al else ignore for elem in word])

>>> write_words_five('abcdabcd', 'ab', '_')
'__cd__cd'

which gives us what we want.

share|improve this answer
    
@user2644430 : Check the edit. :) –  Sukrit Kalra Aug 3 '13 at 19:27
    
thanks a lot, I didn't know what to do! –  user2644430 Aug 3 '13 at 19:52
    
@user2644430 : Please accept the answer if I helped you out. Visit the link and see how accepting an answer works. :) –  Sukrit Kalra Aug 3 '13 at 19:52
    
+1 for masterful, informative, concise solution. –  Jim Aug 3 '13 at 23:36
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Replace your find function by this one:

def myfind(main, x):
    return [i for i,j in enumerate(x) if j==x]

so that in your code:

ys = myfind( word, z )
for y in ys:
    a[y] = z
share|improve this answer
add comment

This should do what the OP asked, with minimal change to the original code. Does not work if "_" is an allowed character in al.

def write_words (word, al):
    newal = (list(al))
    n = len(word)
    i = 0
    x = 0
    a = []
    b = ["_"]
    for i in range(0, n):
        a = a + b
    while (x <(len(newal))):
        z = newal[x]
        y = word.find(z)
        while (y >= 0):
            print (y)
            a[y] = z
            word[y] = "_"
            y = word.find(z)
        x = x + 1
    return a
share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate on your answer? –  Cole Johnson Aug 3 '13 at 19:44
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